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https://www.duolingo.com/bernicelty21

getting used to masculine and feminine forms is by far the toughest thing yet

i think masculine and feminine forms are pretty tricky to learn, does anyone else feel the same?

3 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/THEMONOGLOT

As a beginner it may help to just assume that words that end in -a and -dad will be feminine, and those that end in -o are masculine. There are exceptions: but not so many that it would make learning the rule useless. In fact, there really aren't THAT many when you compare Spanish to other languages. So just keep studying and reviewing, maybe even create mnemonic lists to help you remember the exceptions. You'll get there!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BluePanthers1

I definitely agree it is hard for us in the beginning!! But you will get there.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bernicelty21

thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BluePanthers1

never stop trying till you get it

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolynnedougherty
jolynnedougherty
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It was really tricky in the beginning for me as a native English speaker, because we don't have anything like it is English. I don't suppose it would bother a native French or Spanish speaker. I am curious, for instance, if un couteau (a knife) which is masculine in French would also be masculine in Spanish? Sometimes the genders make sense and sometime they seem very random. Having a familiarity with it in French made it much easier when I started Spanish. Good luck with your studies. You will get it. Just keep trying.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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Genders in French and Spanish are more often the same than not, but they are not always the same. At least, for the first couple of checkpoints in the French course they are more often the same. I only know a few hundred words so that might not be a valid impression.

But "el vestido" and "la robe" (the dress) are different genders.
El traje and le costume (the suit) are both masculine.
Spanish has one word for food and meal, la comida.
French has la nourriture for food and el repas for meal.

So, from what I have seen, they are usually the same but there are plenty of differences.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bernicelty21

thanks, I'll make a mental note of that

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolynnedougherty
jolynnedougherty
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I would love to know the origins of language. Who decided that a dress was masculine? Did men wear dresses way back at the beginning? Thanks Irtward for answering my question.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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You know what's odd is that I learned "el vestido" and never thought twice about the gender; I just memorized it. Then when I came across "la robe" in French, it was like a slap in the face: "Hey! Why is 'el vestido' masculine?!! Who's in charge here, anyway?!"

I just looked up "vestido" in the RAE
It turns out that it primarily means clothing that covers the body; the notion of a woman's dress is a secondary meaning. It also can mean a ceremonial garment. So I suppose it's not quite so odd, after all.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THEMONOGLOT

In this case, knife is masculine just like in French. It's el cuchillo. Just in case you were still wondering.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolynnedougherty
jolynnedougherty
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Thanks :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hugyfew

It was a minor problem at first, but never "the toughest thing yet". It's quite simple: feminine forms have an "a" near or at the end.

3 years ago