Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"They are my employees."

Translation:Ellos son mis empleados.

0
5 years ago

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/GreenWolfGo

i put the correct answerer, and it marked it wrong! it showed the correct soulutions and i checked mine thuroughly! im gunna report this.

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sumi009

I wrote "mi" instead of "mis" and it was correct but it warned me to pay attention to gender. What does "mi" vs. "mis" have to do with gender?

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jhonalexan609573

Ellas son mis empleadas. Ella es mi empleada. Ellos son mis empleados. Él es mi empleados. For "mi" the same in English doesn't exist difference in the gender.

Hope this can help.

1
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
  • 22
  • 20
  • 15

There's an 's' too much in your last example. :)

0
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nworthey
nworthey
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1253

The app wouldn't speak "empleadas" which I took to mean it was a wrong choice so I chose "empleados" -- just a bug causing a little confusion.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eyanisko

Why is it ser and not estar? Employment is not a permanent feature.

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

Ser is used for "relationships.¨ Por ejemplo Ella es mi hija. Jose es mi chofer.

7
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

Yes, you could get fired, but it is quite permanent usually. Also, we use "ser" for professions. "Employee" is a profession in this case.

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

Yet another sign that the permanent/temporary thing is not true. It's "ser" because it's a statement of identity ("who are they?").

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mssharhughes

Ellos son mis empleados should be a correct translation of "they are my employees"

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amayen3

That's what I put and it counted as incorrect

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelMea415607

First they want empleados then they want obreos , do they want mistakes?

1
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Somasmi

Could we say "Ustedes somos mis empleados"?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

No. "Ustedes" is "you," and "somos" goes with "we" (nosotros).

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timestorm
timestorm
  • 21
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 3

what about "ellos son empleados mios" ?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

Nope. See elsewhere in the thread.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StuartJAlexander

Why not mis agentes

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

An agent is not the same thing as an employee. Anybody who works in place of another is an agent, whether they're an employee or not. Some establishments style themselves as "agencies," and their employees are typically also "agents."

Likewise, an employee is often not empowered to represent anything on behalf of their employer, nor do all employees work for an establishment that styles itself an "agency."

0
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicholasDeLeon

What?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1r3n4

I think this was the first time there were two correct answers to be marked! Yay!

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blitzen3

Why not "Ellos son empleados mios"?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

"Mío" is a determiner (like an adjective, except it describes its noun's reference, not any of its properties). In Spanish, when determiners modify nouns directly, they come before the noun, not after. Moreover, "mío" is one of those words that apocopates (loses a final sound) when it comes before its noun, becoming "mi."

So it's "Ellos son mis empleados." All of this is quite analogous to the distinction between the English word-pairs "my/mine," "her/hers," and "your/yours," by the way.

Separate the thing from its noun and none of the above applies, however, so "The employees are mine" is "Los empleados son míos."

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Palmer51

I used the Personal "a" in my translation, "Ellos son a mis empleados." Duolingo counted it WRONG! Was it incorrect to add the Personal "a" because employees are not considered personal enough?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

No, it's because personal "a" is not used with the verb "ser" (nor "tener" or "hay", for that matter).

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Palmer51

thank you!

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeyClarie1

Im not confused this question says you are wrong no matter what answer you choose

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim_actuary

OK for all the grammar talk, but aren't we missing a big point? How is this an idiomatic expression???? The Spanish says "They are my employees." The English says "They are my employees." As presented here, I have no idea how, where or why a native Spanish speaker would use this phrase in an idiomatic manner.

If anyone has any insights on this, that would be appreciated.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

One would presumably say this to indicate that certain people were your employees. I can't tell from your question what it is you find mysterious about this.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim_actuary

Well, I feel like the bonus skill on idioms has left me one short. So, I have a bonus idom for anyone who is following this. Looking up the names of vegetables in Spanish, I came across the following:

"Entre col y col, lechuga."

Literally, "Between cabbage and cabbage, lettuce."

Idiomatically, "Variety is the spice of life."

Enjoy!

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
  • 22
  • 20
  • 15

Dear Tim. This sentence is not part of the "Idioms" lesson, but of the lesson "Occupation". It happens now and then that one sentence from a different lesson slips in while you learn. No need for an extended rant.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim_actuary

(Pardon the following rant, but I am seeing this sentence in a unit on idioms. If you are seeing it in a different unit, then you wouldn't expect it to be an idiom - which is of course why I am off on a rant.) (Paid 30 lingots for a bonus unit on idioms.)

Clearly you don't understand what an idiom is. If I point to something (which is what "they" does in the phrase), and that something is certain people who work for me (which is what an "employee" is), then the literal and word-for-word translation of the supposed idiomatic expression is just "they are my employees." There is NOTHING idiomatic about that.

In contrast, a good idiom for describing idioms is the English idiom: "A picture is worth a thousand words." Is the price of a picture, photograph, drawing, painting, etching, engraving, mural or doodle actually denominated in grammatical units of letter strings, specifically 1000 words?

An idiom is a picture. In this example, I have been given a 4 word picture, and I am getting exactly 4 words of value. This is a far cry from the 1,000 that I am due.

So, again, I ask - when, where and/or how is this ("Ellos son mis empleados" used idiomatically? Does one point to something other than people? Or, are the people other than employees, but the idiom describes them as such for some purpose? Or, is it used in some other fashion. For example, a linguist might refer to words as his/her employees?

</rant off>

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim_actuary

An idiom is something that a native speaker understands, but the literal translation doesn't reveal the true or full meaning to the non-native speaker. If I say -

"A mule and his pony are soon farted." -

the non-native speaker just sees a puzzling bit of nonsense. In contrast, the native speaker of English intuitively solves the puzzle and hears a horrible, juvenile attempt at making a pun on the expression -

"A fool and his money are soon parted."

0
Reply2 years ago