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"Ella come un emparedado."

Translation:She eats a sandwich.

5 years ago

59 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ouzaru

There's almost half a dozen Spanish words for sandwich, most of them dialectical. This is the first I've heard of "emparedado", I'd be interested to know where it's most commonly used.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KirstenPeo

Me to

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redgamer203

Me to

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/warriorsfan30

Ditto

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swanarcadian

bocadillo is an alternative word for sandwich, IIRC.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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No. "Sándwich" can be a type of "bocadillo", but "bocadillo" means "snak", that food you put in some plates in a party.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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snack not snak.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alainad1

Oops typo. You dont have to be so technical, ya spell nazi!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabeHasNoLife

lol weeb

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jorgebompal
jorgebompal
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bocadillo = tentempié, pasapalos, and others

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kate.redhead13

o el sandwích

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BigDMax

Duh

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluth12

I'm from Argentina and all my life I've heard the word "emparedado" in every translated movie, TV show, cartoon or what have you I've watched. So it's weird for me to know now that no one has heard that word before (I mean not even native Spanish speakers are saying that they use the word "emparedado" in their country...)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duvet_154

Yeah, I know, I feel the same. I'm from Bolivia and here we say "sandwich" but I know the word "emparedado" because that's the word they used in every show/movie/cartoon/etc that was dubbed or subbed to spanish. Most of those dubs were made in Colombia and Mexico (if I remember correctly) so I thought that's what they called sandwiches over there :/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Don't think this word is used too much in Latin America. Can someone verify?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cocacola321

Yes, you're right. People say sándwich but it'd pronounced more like [sandweirdchd] jaja

Emparedado is a Spanish thing.

A Bocadillo is more of a snack generally made with harder bread that what Americans/Brits/Aussies are used to. It generally has ham in it. (common in Spain)

A montadito is similar but smaller.

It varies by country and sometimes region.

In Mexico, if it has a lot of layers, like lettuce, and tomatoes, and such, it's called a torta.

Oh oh and sanduche in Ecuador BTW.

Bocadillo is the complete sandwich.

If you want to be gnit picky emparedado is the food inbetween the two bread halves.

IMHO it's best to stick with sándwich as a general word and then learn the others as you progress to intermediate lessons. The same goes for words like sombrero where DL ALWAYS translates as being hat whereas gorra is probably the best 'general' word. But that's whole different story.

Espero que se entienda mi explicación. Buena suerte!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neptilo
Neptilo
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In Argentina they say sánguche.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

This is all very fascinating and helpful. As someone that wants to travel through Central and South America one day, this is certainly going in my notes :).

Cheers!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jorgebompal
jorgebompal
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in Venezuela pasapalos, tentempié and others

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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"Tentempié" is used in Argentina too, but mostly by old people, not by youngers.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jorgebompal
jorgebompal
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:)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Valestellarium

In Chile "sandwich" is used for this. Here we never say "emparedado".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mc_Kate

I've heard "Sandwich" with an accent!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/goinglikesixty

In the central valley of Costa Rica they say sandwich

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Valestellarium

In Chile we do too.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LilaCrazyGirl

you live in Chile?!!?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Valestellarium

yes

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Micah601531

huh

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kaitlinw98

In my spanish classes we learn 'sandwich' (with the accent) as well! Ive taken spanish for two years, and never have i heard of an 'emparedado'... we learn Latin American spanish... not spanish as spoken in Spain... maybe thats it??

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

There's a whole host of different terms for sandwich including torta, bocadillo, sandwích and emparedado as well as some other regional variations. In Spain, according to my language exchange partner, a sandwich is referred to as bocadillo or sandwích.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucasGuerrero

lol i spelled sandwich, sandwhich

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/afaemous

I always thought the word for "sandwich" was "torta"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Torta is used by Mexican-Americans for sandwich. Go to any Hispanic restaurant in Douglasville, Georgia, USA, and you'll see it on the menu. But you're right torta is also the word for cake, too.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Valestellarium

Nope, "Torta" means cake.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lulucianna

It does mean cake, and it also means sandwich in Mexico. Just like tarta, pastel, queque, and biscocho mean cake. Ahhh so many words for the same thing! haha!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/w0418658

In my classes I've only heard of sandwich (with an accent somehwere in there) and bocadillo. Never heard of this word!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Valestellarium

In Chile nobody uses it, lol. We just say "sandwich".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/claireyoung100

Anyone know which country uses this word for sandwich?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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According to a lot of discussion on Duolingo, the answer is Spain.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tempest01

Why not "she eat a sandwich"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

Because this is a Spanish to English translation and not Spanish to Ebonics :p.

In English, eat conjugates to eats for he, she and it. Since ella = she, then come must translate to "eats"

:)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/antoniojack
antoniojack
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I can't hear any sound except the bell... help?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bvm1935

The word sandwich was not introduced in the program before. Therefore how do you expect someone to know the meaning of this word? BobbyO

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redgamer203

Also me

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/broncopayton

i have so much swag that if i was a transformer i would be named swagatron

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KhalonRodney

Dang, I forgot "un" meant a or an

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mandolinsue2

What ever happened to bocadillo?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kai_sparkle

kai it kinda hard to say

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Miguel_BLT

emparedado IS NOT A WORD WTF

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ansharysul

i want to ask something, what the different of the masculine and feminine words? anyone can explain me?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ansharysul

i want to ask something. what the different of the masculine and feminine words? how we can know it? anyone can explain me, please?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KhalonRodney

The difference between masculine and feminine words are masculine words end in "o" or any other letter, an example would be "El escritorio" and "El ratón". Feminine nouns end in "a" or "cion". Examples are "La niña" and "La vacacion". You can tell because of the article. If the article is "El, Los, Un, or Unos" it is masculine. If the article is "La, Las, Una, or Unas" it is feminine.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaliahDaydream

I learned on rosetta stone that it was un sándwich or just sándwich so I'm very confused

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KhalonRodney

What you learned is the "Spanglish" form of "sandwich". "Spanglish" if is the combination of "English" and "Spanish". "Emparedado" is the word the people from Spain would say. Both are correct, but you should use "Emparedado" because it is the real Spanish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jade139326

Why is it come and not comes?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KhalonRodney

It's "come" because when you conjugate "comer" the verb of "eat" for él/ella/usted, the conjugation will always be "come". "Comes" is only for the pronoun "tú". Don't confuse the two or Duolingo will mark it wrong every single time.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rnhm3

It can possibly be she ate a sandwich too isn't it

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moomoo2016

crap, i didnt know this was "sandwich," and i'm going into my fourth year of spanish :c I only knew sándwich

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nefe19

Does anyone find this difficult

2 years ago