"Téannanscéaltharam."

Translation:The story goes over me.

4 years ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/halcyondais
halcyondais
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These preposition lessons need sorting out- none of the answers are good English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/centonola
centonola
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YES!!! This is the first lesson I've run into in the course that really needs serious work before it can move beyond beta. Way too many sentences are just meaningless in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fear_dhoire

I dunno this makes perfect sense to me. We would understand this up north, well derry and donegal anyway

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Crondogz
Crondogz
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What would it mean there? That the story is about me (this lesson goes over X) or that it goes over my head?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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I agree. Well, it's not the English I speak anyway.

I don't mind the usual Duolingo sentences like 'I am an apple' but here I feel like I'm missing an idiom or something.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SoBroithe
SoBroithe
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Definitely a strange English sentence. I can't figure out what is meant. My answer "The story is beyond me" was not accepted.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anfeardathuil

Adding my hat to the "This lesson makes no sense" ring. Are these all really idiomatic? If so, having that meaning shown would be very helpful.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

I'm honestly not sure if these are idiomatic, and it's certainly not attested in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla. I feel they're just completely made up to show the declension of the prepositions.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lukeebyrnee

For anyone wondering, in Ireland it is very common to say something goes "over me" or, probably more commonly, "goes over my head". It means you didn't understand what was said :)

It's certainly not an error and is correct English where this language is spoken - in Éirinn!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Searlasmane

I've never heard "goes over me" used this way in Ireland - "goes over my head", yes, but not "goes over me".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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It’s commonly used in the States as well, but that’s not the meaning of the Irish sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dwarven_hydra
dwarven_hydra
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Does this mean like it seems, that I don't understand the story? This whole lesson is rather confusing with its translations…

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/magickman
magickman
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I interpreted it in the same way as the English: 'The story went over my head' (i.e. 'I missed the point entirely')

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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That’s how I’d interpreted it. Tharam can also mean “beyond me” or “past me”, either of which would also preserve that same meaning in English.

EDIT: See my comment in this discussion; this meaning doesn’t apply, but it could mean “The story skipped over me” / “The story omitted me”.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mplarner

One of the things I feel could be improved about this whole course is a better use of all the vocabulary I have learned so far. Not only would it help imbed words and their spelling, but it would illustrate their use. It would encourage a wide and balanced range of conversation....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IuileanMGabhann

Anyone else feel like they’re getting better at the course, but not actually a lot better at speaking Irish?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SilverPill

For posterity and because the course seemingly hasn't changed: Of course I'm great at the course yet can't understand a lick of spoken Irish except a few pronouns here and there. So far I'm not sure if the course is lacking or if it's just unavoidable that you must be speaking Irish (particularly) in order to understand it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
SatharnPHL
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You have to engage with spoken Irish to develop the habits and reflexes necessary to understand spoken Irish. The individual sentences here on Duolingo (for all their limitations) can give you an introduction to the kind of sounds that you will hear in spoken Irish, and can get you started on the road to "translating" the written word to the spoken word (ie learning how to read aloud).

You can read a written language a line at a time, with a dictionary and grammar book at your side, if you have to, but dealing with any spoken language requires the ability to parse the sounds and then translate them, without taking a break. That takes practice. Duolingo's Timed Practice can help you to get used to thinking on your feet, and translating what you hear reasonably quickly, but you really do need to practice, either passively (watching TG4 or listening to RnaG or other sources) or actively, by finding other people to speak Irish with (even just getting in the habit of speaking Irish to yourself, or to your family if they'll put up with it is helpful). TG4 and RnaG are the same price as Duolingo - just your time and bandwidth. Not only will you get better at dealing with spoken Irish, you'll also get more exposure to the dialect differences, which is important with such a "small" language as Irish - you will always be exposed to a range of dialects when speaking Irish "in the wild".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soupandbread

Téann an ceacht seo tharam..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JediHolly
JediHolly
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Does "over me" in this case mean "over my head," as in "The story goes over my head?" (I have an image of Drax the Destroyer, claiming, "Nothing goes over my head! My reflexes are too fast, I would catch it.")

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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No — see my comment in this discussion.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewMoriarity

What bothers me on these sentences is that if you put the English idiom that applies, it is not accepted. If you translate literally, it makes no sense.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ozzy515
ozzy515
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Couldn't it mean "The story is about me"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ballygawley
Ballygawley
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For that you would have to go back to "Prep 2" where this identical sentence appears:

Tá an scéal fúm.

https://www.duolingo.com/skill/ga/Prepositions-2/4

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John365571

from O donaill 4. Miss, omit. Chuaigh sé thar chuid den téacs, he omitted some of the text. So this would read "the story doesn't mention me"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JD.Hogan-Davies
JD.Hogan-Davies
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I took it to mean that the story is "over my head," as in, "I don't understand it."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffFoster14
JeffFoster14
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I took "over me" to mean "The story goes over my many crimes and faults in thoroughly appalling detail."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mikemilg
Mikemilg
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The "report a problem" facility does not have an option for meaningless English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatHargan
PatHargan
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I tried 'the story goes past me' but it wasn't accepted. I know it's meaningless (only because it's a story rather than, say, a bus), but so is 'the story goes over me'. I've reported it as an error anyway.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iongantas
iongantas
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So whatever the first word she's saying clearly ends with an m sound, not an n sound. Is this a defect of the example, or does it really get pronounced that way?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
SatharnPHL
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I clearly hear an "n" sound at the end of "téann".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clairelanc3
clairelanc3
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You wrote " the storey" as a correction to my sentene ( I made a mistake too and wrote stories) but it is completely incorrect

5 months ago
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