"Cloch na Blarnan."

Translation:Blarney stone.

4 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DannyMcKil
DannyMcKil
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Glad to see the essentials of Irish culture are being covered (or is it Irish-American). Expecting leprechauns next).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatHargan
PatHargan
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I agree, how many times have the Blarney Stone or Blarney Castle come up? Counties and other major place names would surely be more useful, e.g. Gaillimh, Sligeach, Luimneach, Béal Feirste, Baile Átha Cliath...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FinnHasson
FinnHasson
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Believe me, this isn't Irish-American either. This is something someone would say if you made the mistake of telling them you're Irish-American.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hec10tor
hec10tor
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wait there aren't any leprechauns in ireland? I thought they were the last irish speakers, if they don't exist why am I wasting my time here?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rewjeo
Rewjeo
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This stone is supposed to give you the gift of the gab if you kiss it. I realize now that a week after I kissed this stone this past summer I started on Duolingo. I suppose it works in a way, then, doesn't it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PolMicheal
PolMicheal
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Tá uaim phógadh Cloch na Blarnan. ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1musketieragain

Excuse me for asking, but what is Blarney stone?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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It is a particular stone built into Blarney castle that if kissed supposedly endows one with the gift of eloquence!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blarney_Stone

http://www.irelandseye.com/blarney/blarney.shtm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1musketieragain

Thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gerry.0
gerry.0
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It is the worst tourist trap in Ireland :~(

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UdNwike1
UdNwike1
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Tá an ghrian ag scoilteadh na gcloch

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/river-meadow

Can "cloch" also translate as "rock"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnLonDubhBeag

Rock would be Carraig.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Perhaps only in the smallish North American sense of a rock; it wouldn’t be used in the large sense of a rock, i.e. large enough to be a nautical hazard. To avoid ambiguity, “stone” would be the better choice.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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In my part of North America, I don't think there is a difference between a rock and a stone, though if we are talking about a material, it would only be stone, e.g. a stone bridge or a house made of stone.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Yes, in much (if not all) of North America, the words can be interchangeable when speaking of a discrete object of a certain size, e.g. small enough to throw from a handheld sling; my intended point about avoiding ambiguity was that they aren’t necessarily interchangeable in that same way in other forms of English worldwide.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SiobhanWray

A rock is bigger than a stone.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DSDragon
DSDragonPlus
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Not necessarily. A stone is a kind of rock, but not all rocks are stones. Kind of like the "all squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares" thing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eurotrashfreak
eurotrashfreak
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i agree with other commenters. towns and counties of ireland are more relevant than blarney stone.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/branbow040

Why is the definite article plural if "cloch" is singular?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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The definite article here does not apply to "cloch" but to the noun following it. In this phrase cloch is followed by the genitive case of the noun (stone of the ...). The noun is feminine and the form of the article accompanying a feminine noun in the genitive case is "na"; hence Cloch na Blarnan.

1 year ago
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