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"Ik eet lunch om half twee."

Translation:I eat lunch at one thirty.

3 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/juko_4

Would "Ik eet om half twee lunch." or " Om half twee eet ik lunch." be wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sir_Carl
Sir_Carl
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Lunch can be used to mean lunch in Dutch, but in my experience the word is almost never used in Utrecht/Culemborg (Central/south Netherlands). Rather, "middageten" is used in this case.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/waza
waza
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'I have lunch at one thirty' wrong there?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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No, it should be accepted, I hope you reported it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TrentNock

Umm. I thought eten is to eat. And they said "ik eet". So it should be "eat" not "have". ....... right?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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To have lunch is just a different way of saying to eat lunch, similar to een maaltijd eten and een maaltijd nuttigen.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A.Joyce

In england half one and half pastv one are both correct ways of saying one thirty. Should these be accepted?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UnitarioRe

English Speaker, why is "at" in this kind of sentence?ยก

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A.Joyce

Because "at" can be used to say where something happened. But also, can be used to say when something happened.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/henkaipantomime

Why not "around"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brijsven
Brijsven
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When referring to time you would use om before the desginated time. This is used when a specific time is stated.

  • rond half twee uur -- around one-thirty [ambiguous; not stated whether it's one-thirty a.m. or p.m.]

  • om twee uur 's middags -- at two o'clock p.m.

  • om twee uur 's morgens -- at two o'clock a.m.

In this example: I eat lunch at one thirty -- Ik eet lunch om half twee.

The time of day can only be inferred from context and sociological 'norms' (e.g. lunch is a meal commonly consumed after 12pm (noon) in some parts of the world). Otherwise it would be necessary to mention what time of day (e.g. by using 's morgens/middags/avonds/nachts or including another word/clause/etc. that provides context.

24-hour time format

  • Ik eet om 14:00 uur. -- "I eat at 14:00/2pm."
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gymnastical
Gymnastical
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Because around and at mean two different things. The general idea is the same but that doesn't necessarily mean it works that way in Dutch

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JacolManuki

Is it like "I eat lunch at half before two"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brijsven
Brijsven
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Yeah, pretty much. -- I eat lunch at half (an hour) before two.

2 years ago