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"Él se quiere."

Translation:He loves himself.

5 years ago

63 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/folioverso

Am I the only one who doesn't see any explanation of how to use this "se" pronoun at DL at all? Where do you get it?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BargainBasement

No kidding. For such a foreign concept to English speakers, DL does a piss poor job of explaining it. I don't get that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PCinCalifornia

This is a reflexive verb. TO "love oneself," you need both the "love" and the "himself." With reflexive verbs, the object (himself) goes before the verb (love).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Matthew53527

Se- simply means "himself" the same as "me- myself' but you place it before a verb. As I see by looking at the DL's examples I see that Spanish speakers say "I love" instead of "I love myself" Sometimes you just search for patterns and you find out the example.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

Searching out patterns is good and a good tip for everyone. Then use a trustworthy resource to confirm it.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan597269

folioverso....i was wondering the same thing...if you leave out the le, les, los, las, etc.... you get the same answer...clarification would help greatly...

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/witcradg

Shouldn't "He likes himself" also be valid?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

"Likes" translates as "gustar" ;]

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pinguino.diablo

"Likes" has been given as a correct translation for quiere in quite a few of the questions though, which is a bit confusing. I previously got "ella no se quiere" and it was translated as "she does not like herself"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Espanolisto

I don't know, but my gut hunch, which seems consistent with the answers that I've got, is that you can use quiere for "likes" with objects, but when applied to people it means "loves". I don't know, but I haven't been marked wrong yet on this. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roberto786556

i thought it could also be simply( he want) is that wrong? anyone

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MajaO5
MajaO5
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He loves himself is the same as he wants himself, it's about lust/romantic attraction.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miettasmom

I can't even fathom how they got this answer. Doesn't se mean him/her/it? So why is "he loves it" wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

The "himself" part comes from the reflexive "se" up there, that means the person does the action on himself (if that makes sense: se mira al espejo = he looks at himself in the mirror).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davgleonard

According to my book "se"= is, oneself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, yourselves, themselves.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cranberry4848

Thank you! I couldn't find that anywhere for some reason. I was confused about "se" vs "la" or "lo".

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mafriend

him, her, it = lo, le

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MadScientista

I also put "he likes himself." If I'm not mistaken, a previous question said "ella no se quiere" and was translated to "she does not like herself." Is there a reason it is different in this case?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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Ella is for she, No is for negation, Se is used as a reflexive object pronoun in this example (sometimes se lends to the passive voice, however, which is acceptable in Spanish from what I've heard), and Quiere for like.

Ella she, No, does not, Se Quiere like herself.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pinguino.diablo

The question is why "he likes himself" is not acceptable in this case. Did DL make a mistake?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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Ah ok I see now. I would say report it. I believe that should be one of the options.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Usaviboy7, the MadScientist was asking about using "like" (and not love) this time and was not accepted by DL, when it was accepted in the previous example (with both examples having se quiere). I wish some native speakers could shed light on this also.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/icedog1

Can someone explain when quiere means love and when I means like. It seems that the use is inconsistent.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kriefhelm

Quiero can mean like, but it's an intimate or strong like. For example, I tell mi abuela that 'Te quiero' vs. amo (typically romantic), but if you liked food it would be "Me gusta <food item>" or "Me gusta esta". If it were your favorite food, you might say "Me quiero esa", but that would usually just be "I want that". Unfortunately, this may be one of the things that is very reflexive as you get used to using it, but codifying it isn't as clear.

Perhaps another way of thinking of it is: Gustar - like Querar - like a lot OR want Amar - love

That said, if someone said this in conversation, you could probably take it either way and be okay.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatB.

I agree. The use is inconsistent in these examples. Explanation anyone?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geekchorus

Se is complicated. It can make a verb reflexive--as it does here. But it can also become an indirect object when "lo", "la", "los", or "las" are present as a directo object: "Voy a darselo." "I am going to give it to him."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErinVanDer

He loves himself all night long...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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I tried both he loves it/him/her. None of these worked. Update: "he loves himself" worked. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

Se is reflexive, which means he (verbs) himself. Se (or te/me) reflects the verb back to the subject. I love myself. She washes herself. He hears himself.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AwwwMan

Thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JR777300

Does this saying carry the same meaning in Spanish as it does in English?

He loves himself.... in meaning that he thinks that he is awesome and just the best?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

one of the other sentences was "ella no se queire" and it translated to "she doesn't like herself" however when I put "He likes himself" here it marked it as incorrect. tsk tsk...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PupherFish

KANYE

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rja96

Is this about you again Kanye?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/craaash80
craaash80
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Forever alone.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iamanand907

A narcissist one!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jimijimmy

Is "se" always used reflexively? Can it refer to another person other than the one doing the action?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reinae2

Looks like always reflexively. Himself, itself, themselves etc

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicholasBeninato

doesn't querer mean to want? so shouldn't it be he wants him?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

Querer means to want but it also is used in terms of liking/loving someone.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Yes, seems like everybody is aware of that. The question was/is why "like" isn't accepted now when it was accepted in the past example? The two examples are practically the same, with the only difference now being a positive sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

He didn't say or ask anything about "like" not being accepted in this example. His question is why "wants" isn't accepted. The main answer is because it's reflexive and when it's reflexive and querer meaning to love and to want, love is the obvious choice.

Like isn't accepted because that would be gustar.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mr.jameson

There is a confusion here. A previous sentence was "ella no se quiere" and the correct DL translation was "she does not like herself". Now the sentence is "Él se quiere" and the correct DL translation is "He loves himself". Why the verb "like" is not an acceptable translation in the second question?

And how would you say in Spanish "he likes himself"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

well to be honest the first one, ella no se quiere shouldn't have accepted she does not like herself. querer is for want & love and gustar is for like. It should have been ella no le gusta. and he likes himself should be A él le gusta.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CWKCA
CWKCA
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So to clarify: does querer + a thing always mean want, and querer + a person always means love?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mws1225
mws1225
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Good for him!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PCinCalifornia

Querer can mean to want or to love. What I didn't know is that quererse can only refer to loving someone. If you say, "Te quiero," that means I love you. When you say, "Se quiere," does that have to mean he loves himself or can it mean he loves someone else? I have read all the comments here and I have yet to see an answer to this question that is unambiguous to me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmat10
jmat10
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Does anyone know if se in the sentence is an indirect or a direct object (Él se quiere).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/csillagdora

I searched on the web and did not find this meaning but a little different on "wordreference" :

<pre> "quererse VERBO PRONOMINAL (recíproco) - nosotros nos queremos = we love each other - se quieren como hermanos = they love each other like brothers" OR just put an emphasis: - No me quiero enamorar. I don't want myself to fall in love, is the same as No quiero enamorarme. - "¡Me odio esperando!" She grew quite agitated at having to wait for her neice to come out so we could go somewhere - this was written by the commenter, so this sentnces was told by a "real girl in real life" :D </pre>

But I did not find the asnwer if really exist in spansh "me quiero / se quiere" for "I love myself / he loves himself".... I will ask a native speaker or someone :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UTFong
UTFong
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Does this mean he loves himself at this moment?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jcsintl75
jcsintl75
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Since when does "want" / "quiere" equal love?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PCinCalifornia

I think this is what confuses non-native speakers: Él se quiere mucho. He loves himself a lot. (Here the reflexive is implied? explicit?) Él se quiere morir. He wants to die. (Here?)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karjun

What does " se" refers here

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bob20020
Bob20020
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Is "se" the German "sich"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Howblaze

The male speaker says quiere but ot sonds like "quirde". So the "r" has an "rd" sound. Is this correct?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnaKerie
AnaKerie
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Él se quiere largo tiempo

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenjaminBl12

I was under the impression that "Se" is a part of a group of words to denote a direct object (along with la lo las los) but its a reflexive indicator? In earlier examples it was used to indicate the presence of a direct object: "él se come una manzana". That sentence doesnt mean "he eats himself an apple" does it? If so, how could it be necessary? It's obvious that he himself is the one eating the apple since he is the only subject in the sentence. As has been pointed out, DL leaves huge gaps, which comes from a trial and error based learning. Can someone help me fill those gaps?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cyberlingual

Yo se quiero = I love "myself" Yo quiero = I love Los niños se comen arroz = The children "themselves" eat rice.. Now the second one it is not required to use "se" but the first one is an example of when it is required. It is useful to learn the ones where it is not needed because people use it a lot.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShanzidaHaque

Can se also be used for 'herself'?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aumbria

I love myselfie as well! Buddies!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andre_Apm

Can't relate

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mary255555

how can a dude love himself?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SinisterSouthpaw

What about "He is loved," could this also work?

1 month ago