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"Elle court vingt kilomètres."

Translation:She runs twenty kilometers.

3 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/KaitteKat

The English sentence sounds off as given. I would say "She runs for 20 km", just saying "She runs 20 km" sounds incomplete to me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

How ironic! I, on the other hand, find it sounding off with "for" in there. I would use "for" when talking about the time or the reason: she runs for an hour every day for charity.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vic234518
vic234518
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I am a runner and we often use "kilos" as distance and not weight.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sschank
sschank
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In the USA, "kilo" only ever means "kilograms." In this sentence, an American is likely to say that she runs "twenty k" (but never "twenty kilos").

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
BenYoung84
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Interesting, I never heard that before. I thought the standard informal version was ks (as in "kays").

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vic234518
vic234518
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Kays is not as popular here (South Africa). It could be the influence from Afrikaans though. My Afrikaans mates definitely use "kilos" when talking about distance in Afrikaans and that probably caused some "cross pollination" into the local English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SabnSaa

Duo definitely does some odd things. I wrote the exact sentence as above--and it gave me as an *alternate" translatioon, the same sentence. I looked it over carefully to see if there were a letter out of place, but no, 'twas exact.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/larsbj
larsbj
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I just had the same. I suspect Duo is trying to say that that kilometre and kilometer are both accepted. British and American English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katherine834645

"court" also means "short" as well..... She is short twenty kilometers. Which also means she needs twenty more kilometers. Duolingo does not make it clear in this sentence. But then perhaps in french one does not state such a problem in that way.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

"She runs..."‎ is two words: a pronoun and a verb, hence elle court.... ‎ "She is short..." is three words: a pronoun, a ver‎b and an adjective, so would that not be elle est court...? ‎

Just as in English you would be able to understand "she has worn pyjamas out in public" and "she has worn-out pyjamas in public"‎ to mean two different things, you have to try to make sense of the French sentence given. And since "she short twenty kilometres" does not not make sense, then you know court is being used as a verb not adjective in this exercise.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katherine834645

Thank you, it is obvious now. I should have seen that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KingD-.-
KingD-.-
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Elle aura six plus avoir un marathon

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Isn't a marathon 40 kilometers?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanGordon12

42.165km to be exact. The reason it is that odd distance (which is also an odd distance in imperal measure) is that the original planned course for the 1908 London Olympic marathon from Windsor Castle to the Royal Entrance of White City Stadium was amended to use a different entrance but keeping the finishing line as originally planned. Weird what bits of useless information lurk in what I laughingly call a memory.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Quite right. So 26 miles is fine but not 20 kilometers + 6 (what?).

1 year ago