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https://www.duolingo.com/mercutio

can someone explain these usa language grade levels/classes

I am from uk and I have been searching for readers I can use to slowly build up my level! I can happliy say I have finally found a system that seems to work for me, its called TPRS, I have found level 1 is my level and I can build up through the system and slowly be able to read more complex books. My confusion is, the system seems to be graded by the usa school system, I hear mention of "students taking spanish 1" or "spanish 2" and 3 and 4 so heres my confusion, can an adult be in a "spanish 1" class? or does it refer to age groups going through a school system, anyone from usa is probably familiar with these terms and can explain. thanks

4 years ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mercutio

see here they mention levels 1 etc http://www.tprstories.com/what-is-tprs

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharmingTiger
CharmingTiger
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Having trouble connecting to this site.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mercutio

just tested it and it opened ok, I was using a laptop

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahBecraft

Yes, adults can be in a Spanish 1 course. Typically Spanish 1, Spanish 2, Spanish 3, and Spanish 4 refer to years of studying Spanish in high school, or semesters of studying Spanish in university.

E.g. in my particular school Spanish 4 was equivalent to four semesters of Spanish at the local community college. This is not equally true of all languages, however. French 1 in the same community college was equivalent to two years of high school French... Which is why I dropped the class pretty much immediately - there was no way I'd keep up with that!

I've also heard in some schools four years of Spanish in high school is only the equivalent of one semester of Spanish in community college, which sounds ridiculous because in our school you were supposed to be fluent by the fourth year. I'm not sure how you could spend four years on and only be at about 5 months worth of university coursework... Sounds really boring for the students to go that slowly.

But basically language classes can vary by state and school so I'd take the equivalencies with a grain of salt. But yes, you definitely can be a first year as an adult.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mercutio

thanks, this gives me confidence that even though I am reading TPRS level one this is still an "adult" level, its not like im a toddler! I am really liking the TPRS approach, I have found I can genuinly comfortably read their level 1 readers, and level 2 is also do-able but with looking up the odd word, but whats great is i am seeing words in context in many different sentences AND the stories are actually quite catchy and interesting, not just like picture books. it feels like im reading a "real" story, albeit a simplified one. I had tried readers from uk graded A1 on cefr supposedly the lowest level but I found they were patchy, some totally impossible and some ok, but none actually COMFORTABLE to read, so I think I have found a system where I can slowly build up......well thats the theory

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahBecraft

Well I mean, obviously none of us are reading at 'adult' levels unless we are fluent in our target languages. But yeah, it's not meant to refer to an age, just a level of study in high school/college coursework.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mebestia

tl;dr: Teens and older, also, we teach languages really slowly.

I would actually guess most people in the US are not sure what "Spanish 1" is.

Language classes aren't really consistent over here. Classes in general aren't. There's no standard curriculum, as anyone who moved between cities as a kid will tell you. But I can say that we are dumb, and don't teach little kids foreign languages at all, except in a handful of expensive private schools. So "Spanish 1" is probably 13- or 16-year-olds if you're talking about high school, or 18-year-olds and a few much older stragglers if you're talking about university.

In my high school (high school is about 13 to 18 years old), Spanish was one or two years and I think you could start them at any grade/age. But in my university, two years of high school language classes were considered equivalent to one year of university language classes. And having taken two years of THOSE, I can tell you that you wouldn't come out of them fluent...and you could totally put a little kid through those classes, they'd do fine.

Other than the complexity of the ideas (as in, is this about politics? the reality of living with someone you're in love with? social psychology?), there's really no difference. If a kid gets to Spanish 2, and an adult gets to Spanish 2, they both know the same amount of Spanish.

4 years ago