"Je suis monté."

Translation:I went up.

June 8, 2013

97 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TartanArmyDosh

"I mounted". Any reason this not acceptable?

October 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

To mean "mounted", the verb would probably need some further information, like a direct or indirect object.

  • je suis monté sur mon vélo = I mounted my bicycle
  • j'ai monté le placard Ikea = I mounted the Ikea cupboard (change of auxiliary from "être" to "avoir" with a direct object)
January 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KimSCasey

I have mounted. That's a no-go? Are we ready to go on the trail? (yes) I have mounted.

March 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrbennet

Yes, that should work. "Mount" has several intransitive senses that would work here, including your example.

March 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrbennet

No, that should work.

December 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sdr51

I suppose that "je suis monté dans la voiture" is language that dates from times where one had to climb up into vehicles. Mostly today, I find I need to "get down" to get into cars. But taking "monter" to mean "mount", and mounting a car to mean "get in", I said "Je suis monté" must mean "I got in". So, why is that an incorrect translation. And is "je suis monté" used to mean "mounting" other things, as in "getting in", even when the physical direction is downwards?

September 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"Je suis monté" always conveys an upward direction (tree, car, bicycle, plane, ladder, hill...).

"J'ai monté l'armoire Ikea" (with auxiliary "avoir" and a direct object) = I mounted the Ikea cabinet.

September 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sdr51

But a car is not always an upward direction. For a small one, or a sports car, or something like that, is it even proper then to use "monter" to say that you're getting in? Is there another word or phrase to use in that situation?

September 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrbennet

One of the definitions the Larousse gives for "monter" is "prendre place dans ou sur un véhicule", so it is correct even if the actual direction is downward. Note that it's specific to vehicles - I don't think there's any other usage where the meaning has been stretched so far that "monter" could imply a downward direction.

So "I got in" should be a valid translation, along with "I boarded" and "I got on".

September 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sdr51

Thanks, both of you!

September 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frankie100828

Exactly

November 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcotonio

Your feet inside the car are above floor level, so, in a sense, you are in a higher place.

January 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sdr51

That certainly makes sense - one needs the right perspective. When I get into a car I sit, and when I sit, I sit down. I guess that's what I was thinking of. I sit down in a truck too, but my head may be higher than it was before, because there's a certain amount of "mounting" involved. It's interesting to see how people around the world normally look at these things in very subtly different ways. There's never just one way to look at even the smallest thing.

January 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

Another way of saying it, in Australia anyway, is "to climb into a car". That works equally well for a Lotus or a Landrover and gives the sense of "up". I just tried it ("I climbed in") and it wasn't accepted but I'll report it.

May 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sdr51

I think so too, CJ. "To climb into a car" is used in the U.S. also. Perhaps here, it's used mostly by adults talking to children, who may actually need to do a little climbing to make it in.

May 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CSA_GW

I agree with you that "Je suis monté" always conveys an upward direction "; but my answer "I got up" was rejected and corrected to " I got in"

September 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

“I got up.” has a specific translation into French and would be « Je me suis levé. (or levée for feminine person)

September 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin968039

So, "I went up to my neighbours' home." Would only work if my neighbours were living geographically higher than myself, correct?

August 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

If it is what you mean with the English sentence, "je suis monté chez mes voisin(e)s" will be a correct translation. If they don't live upstairs from you (or up the hill), you can translate your sentence to "je suis allé jusque chez mes voisin(e)s".

August 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/10004017

"I rose" was marked incorrect. Any reason why?

December 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Uyterschout

It is a valid translation according to Larousse - http://www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires/francais-anglais/monter/52368 -
Je suis monté jusqu'au "si" - I rose (sing) up to B
Je suis monté en grade - I rose in rank (promoted)

March 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanPlophead

“I got up” was marked wrong and “I got in” offered as the correct answer.

September 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

“I got up” is used to mean “get up from bed” which uses a different verb in French. “Monter” is also used to “get into a car”. “Get” is rather generic and “climb” is more specifically correct. You can easily see that “getting up” is very different from “climbing up”, but “climbing into a car” is usually referred to as “getting into a car.”

September 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanPlophead

Thanks, what I was envisaging was a response to a question along the lines of. “What did you do when the judge entered the court room?” “I got up” being a common way to referring to an action like standing up or stepping onto a stool in my corner of the UK.

September 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Yes, this verb would definitely not be used for standing up and you would have to mention the stool for the second one.

September 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johndelaroo

Je me suis levé = I got up

September 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BLPK

Would this sentence apply to a mountain as well as stairs or a car? In which case would "I got up" be a good translation, as in "Je suis monte la montagne"= "I got up the mountain."

August 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"je suis monté" can apply to any destination that is "up" from where you start from:

  • je suis monté dans la voiture.

  • je suis monté jusqu'au village sur la colline.

  • je suis monté au premier étage.

  • je suis monté à vélo, à cheval, à l'échelle...

However, "monter" can have another construction, with a direct object instead of a preposition:

  • j'ai monté l'escalier

  • j'ai monté la colline

Therefore "je suis monté la montagne" is not correct: je suis monté sur la montagne or j'ai monté la montagne

August 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deeptendu

Monté à,monté au... which to use in which situation, please explain.

December 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf
  • je suis monté à la corde (feminine = rope)
  • je suis monté à l'échelle (feminine = ladder)
  • je suis monté à l'escabeau (masculine = step stool)
  • je suis monté au premier étage (masculine = first floor)
  • je suis monté aux rideaux (masculine plural = curtains)
  • je suis monté aux façades (feminine plural = façades/fronts)
December 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrbennet

So à l' for objects that begin with a vowel, à la for other singular feminine objects, au for other singular masculine objects, and aux for plural objects of either gender.

But then, just to complicate things, there are cases where the object doesn't take the definite article, like à vélo or à cheval. I think that only applies when monter would be translated as to ride.

December 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Oui, there is also "monter à moto", with the same pattern.

December 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johndelaroo

I got up = je me suis levé . I climbed = j'ai grimpé . I got in, I went up, I ascended = je suis monté . I got down = je suis descendu . I went in, I came in = je suis entré . I went inside = Je suis allé à l'intérieur . I arose = j'ai surgi ....

May 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScottKopel

"I climbed" is also correct

June 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

fyi : grimper = to climb

June 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaimAaribia

pour quoi la règle " deux verbes se suit le deuxième de met a l’infinitif " ne s'applique pas ici ?

July 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrbennet

Quand deux verbes se suivent, le second est à l'infinitif, sauf si le premier est un auxiliaire.

Ici, il s'agit d'un temps composé avec être comme auxiliaire.

July 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaimAaribia

merci bcp

July 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shahrazad26

Does French only have one "to be" verb? Sorry for bothering you.

February 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sdr51

Are you talking about verbs that take "to be" rather than "to have" as an auxiliary? In that case, no there are a number of them, and "monter" takes "avoir". Those using "être" are introduced in the notes to the lesson on the passé composé (composite past).

"Je suis monté" is a use of the participle form of monter, not a past tense, and the participle is often found after "to be". That is a normal use of "to be" however. The participle is used as an adjective in this case.

February 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shahrazad26

No, I wanted to know if there was another to be verb besides "être" . Like in Spanish there is "ser", which is a permanent status (he is a lawyer, es abogado), and "estar", which is a temporary status (he is drunk, está borracho). Both ser and estar mean to be.

February 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

In French it's just « être ». Note that some phrases that use "to be" in English use "to have" in French: "I am thirsty" - « J'ai soif » ("I have thirst").

February 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shahrazad26

Ah, thanks.

February 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LSadun

This is very confusing. In this thread Sitesurf repeatedly explained that "monte'" implies upward motion, and that "I got in" is not really correct. So why did DL just reject "I got on" (as in "I got on a horse, a train, a bike, or a streetcar") and suggest "I got in"? (Reported 5/31/18)

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

“I got up” would be “Je me suis levé.” “I got into a car.” would be « Je suis monté dans une voiture. » without the car, it will not mean “to get in”. So « monter » can mean “to go up” but not “to get up” and in some expressions “to get into a car”. Scroll up and read all of Sitesurf’s comments It cannot mean “I got on” without the word for train, bike, streetcar, horse etc. just like you wouldn’t say “I board the train.” without the train or “I mount the horse.” without the horse. It just means “I went up.”

https://dictionary.reverso.net/french-english/Monter

September 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pnehls

is " I rode" not another possible translation?

July 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrbennet

Yes, it should be.

December 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"riding a horse" is being seated on the horse already.

I rode a horse = j'ai monté un cheval (change of auxiliary)

December 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrbennet

It seems the auxiliary can be either être or avoir, perhaps depending on the context: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1691184 http://www.etudes-litteraires.com/forum/post328123.html#p328123

December 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeblancHer

Je suis monté à cheval.

July 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iella_

Why "I am up" is not right?

February 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1746

"Je suis monté" is compound past, not present tense. So the "je suis..." is not translated as "I am..." but to indicate the compound tense rendered by the past participle of the verb (the root of which is "monté"). Since "monter" is "to go up", it becomes "I went up." Oh dear, I'm sounding very bookish. ;-(

February 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaPirocque

This is a good example of a case that needed an explanation lesson, not just a question instead. Sitesurf answers demonstrate it. I didn't know wheather to this verb you ought to use "être" or "avoir" to realize the passé conposé, and turns out you can use both.

July 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/feyMorgaina

Most verbs are conjugated using avoir as the auxiliary verb.

The following is a list of verbs that use être as the auxiliary verb:

aller, venir, entrer, sortir, ressortir, arriver, partir, repartir, monter, remonter, descendre, naître, mourir, revenir, parvenir, retourner, tomber, rester, rentrer, devenir, and passer

Monter, descendre, sortir, entrer, and rentrer use avoir as the auxiliary when they have direct objects. When there is a direct object the context may change. (e.g. «elle est descendue» ("she came down") versus «elle a descendu les valises» ("she brought the suitcases down")).

The verb passer is tricky - a good dictionary will help. ;-) I never quite remembered all the different instances when to use avoir with passer. This should help - http://www.larousse.com/en/dictionaries/french-english/passer/661830

March 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaPirocque

Composé*

July 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjganto

Their translation as "I have gone up" is no good, as this would be pluperfect, instead of simple past tense.

March 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrbennet

No, pluperfect would be "I had gone up."

"Je suis monté" is passé composé, which can correspond to the present perfect "I have gone up," the simple past "I went up," or the emphatic past "I did go up."

March 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uchual

I've gone? Why is not accepted?

August 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeblancHer

Monté means go up. Your sentence forget the up part

August 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XieC2

How would you say "I am uplifted" in French?

September 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

je suis rehaussé(e), surélevé(e)

September 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slhicks1

Why not "I mounted"?

February 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

I think "I mounted" would need an object.

February 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrbennet

According to the OED, the verb "mount" has a number of intransitive senses as well as transitive ones. Some are quite commonly used and could easily apply here. For example "To travel or proceed in an upward direction; to ascend or climb." or "To get up on to the back of a horse or other animal (occas. on a person's shoulders) for the purpose of riding."

February 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Not enough information, does the intransitive sense of mount correspond to the intransitive sense of "Je suis monté." See, in English we can say "I mounted." and not mention the horse and know by context that was meant, but the expression in French is "monter à cheval" and not just "monter".

Yes, there are some uses, but do they work with this subject. https://dictionary.reverso.net/english-french/mount

August 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

In context, you can also say "je suis monté(e)" with no mention of the horse.

August 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Then, “I have mounted.” and “I mounted.” should be accepted as correct and why not “I am mounted.” ?

August 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A_User

Usually, yes. Occasionally, in specific contexts, it doesn't, but most of the time it does.

February 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johndelaroo

Je suis sorti et j'ai sellé mon cheval. Je suis monté et suis parti.

September 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Craig922327

If monte can mean turned up why was 'I have turned up' marked wrong?

June 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"I turned up" with the meaning of "I arrived" does not match the French meaning of "je suis monté" which is "I went/came up", like "upstairs" or "a ladder".

June 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Forgle_Witts

"I came up." Is marked wrong.

April 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrbennet

I guess it can mean 'turned up' as in 'turned up the volume', but that doesn't make sense in this case. It would need an object, and it would take the auxiliary 'avoir' rather than 'être'.

June 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

My dictionary gives that as "turn up the temperature", etc. To me "I turned up" means "I arrived".

June 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrbennet

Yeah, that's what it means to me too, without an object, but that definitely doesn't work for 'je suis monté'.

June 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RogerDavis9

"I went upstairs" is given in reverso context with many examples. I was marked wrong

October 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

You have to watch out for examples. Sometimes they represent a possible use of a word or phrase. But it could very well be that without supporting context, listeners would more likely take some other meaning from the phrase.

If you are home in your pajamas and coming back from the stairs leading to the bedroom saying ...je suis montre ....would likely be taken to mean you went upstairs. But not if you are standing at the bottom of a mountain. Or leaving a hot air balloon ride.

Je suis monté doesn't mean .. I went upstairs..... However, it can be used to mean that in circumstances where your audience already knows what you are talking about.

October 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RogerDavis9

Thanks for the explanation.

October 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PinkPanther6

why is "turned up" offered as a hint then marked wrong?

October 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrbennet

The hints for a word always give several possible translations, but you still have to figure out which one is appropriate in the context of the sentence you're translating. Otherwise you're just learning to copy and paste.

October 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frankie100828

We would not say went up in english

November 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1746

Admittedly, it sounds a little bare without context, but it is nevertheless completely correct and reasonable. If you say "we would not say xxxx", then please include what you actually would say in this circumstance based on the meaning of the French.

December 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johndelaroo

Est-ce le nous royal ? Vous et la reine?

November 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tabarjack

I climbed aboard should also be correct.

April 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

This interpretation would be nice, should context point to it.

April 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tabarjack

Perhaps a context should be added. Je suis monté dans la voiture or Je suis monté dans la montagne.

April 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zest18

Since in previous sentences "monte" means "died". Does "monte" in this context mean or have a root in that a person went to heaven?

December 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sdr51

Monté does not mean "died".

December 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

Correct! It's « mort » that means "dead"/"died".

December 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

However, "monté" does mean "went up" and it can mean as opposed to going down to that other place. So, if the context is that someone was very ill and then someone said that the person went up to a better place....

August 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MmeKx

Why was "I showed up" marked wrong?

February 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

« monter » means "to go up", "to climb up", etc. Are you perhaps getting it confused with « montrer », "to show"? "To show up" can be translated as « apparaître » or « se montrer ».

February 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blazinghaze

Could this also mean "im turned up" lol an american euphemism for either being 1. Really hype and lively at a social gathering/event or being nice at tipsy at any event lol or has that not made it to france yet lol

April 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Adding "lol" to every bit of your question does not really help understanding it. Anyway, the French can be turned up as anybody else, but they would not use the verbe "monter" to express it.

They would say "je suis ivre, aviné, éméché, émoustillé, gris, mûr, pinté, pompette, rétamé, schlass, soûl" (+ a number of slang words I won't give you here).

April 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/littlecutel

"I got up"? Could that work?

October 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Please scroll up I just answered this above

October 23, 2018
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