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  5. "He has more than her."

"He has more than her."

Translation:Tá níos mó aige ná í.

September 28, 2014

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Why would it not be Tá níos mó aige ná aici? Is this saying that he has her and he has other things as well? I was assuming it meant she has some, but he as more.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

I would translate Tá níos mó aige ná aici as "He has more than she has". in this case is used as a comparison word (than), which is followed by the object form, so it's just saying he has more than her.

Tá mé níos sinne ná í -> I am older than her.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamckillip48

The correct English is 'I am older than she'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

'Correct' English is determined by use. Nobody I know would say 'I am older than she' unless it was formal writing, which is something very different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gwyddnoschdy

Since the program is by default using a prescriptive grammar in Irish, it should do the same in English. It's annoying when the English is poor, and I get something "wrong" even when I'm right!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cait48

I wouldn't say that either, but neither would I say I am older than her--that hurts my ears! In the actual sentence under discussion, though, Duo rejected the compromise He has more than she does, which doesn't hurt my ears and (I hope) doesn't sound weird to those who do say than her. I reported it--maybe it's accepted now.

PS I'm afraid I'm more prescriptive than you--in my area of the US, the simple past is regularly used instead of the past participle for a number of verbs, including swim and run. As far as I'm concerned, that doesn't make I should have ran correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Indeed, 'I have more than she does' sounds correvt to me, but 'I have more than she' sounds... odd. And, yep. I'm not prescriptivist at all when discussing colloquial speech. Now, formal writing and speech is a different story.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cait48

Tell that to Duo! They consistently use the accusative in thei sentence and count the nominative usage wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RozieToez

But the comparison is between aige and í? That doesn't make much sense. That sounds like it's saying "More is at him than she is."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

It means that he has more than just her (or it). Like, say someone owns a window and a door. Talking about the window, you could say that, meaning that he has more than just 'it' (fuinneog is feminine)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RozieToez

Saying you have more than just her is not common in English and for the most part sounds deeply uncomfortable without context. Far, FAR more commonly meant when one says "I have more than her" in informal English is "I have more than she does" and without any other context clues should always be assumed to be the intended meaning.

Does Irish in fact in everyday informal usage do what English does and shortens "than she does" ná aici to just "than her" ná í? If not, how does one say in Irish "I have more than her" as it would commonly be intended in English to be understood? Because I answered Tá níos mó agam ná aici and got marked wrong, because the answer had to be í.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

I think the issue with this one is that the better translation for it would be 'He has more than it'.

But, to answer your question, no. This means literally just 'her'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RozieToez

That's good to know. And sure that seems a much better translation of the Irish. Of course, most of the time this construction comes up in my review, it's asking me to translate from English into Irish and when I got it marked wrong, I wasn't feeling clear whether Tá níos mó aige ná aici was even a proper Irish sentence meaning "He has more than she does."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

aici doesn't mean "she has" - you have to have in there to get from "at her" to "she has". So ná aici doesn't mean "than she has". I'm not sure there is any situation where ná aici makes sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

So, then, this is the grammatically consistent "he has more than her" as opposed to "he has more than she," which is to say that he has her and he as more as well? Since people now use "than her" to compare two people who are the subjects of the same verb, this sentence is now ambiguous.

Actually, I don't remember ever learning that that was the object case of the pronoun. Thanks again.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

I'd say if you want to stress that he has her, you'd add a quantifier to it, much as you would do in English ("He has more than her" to mean that he has more than just her wouldn't said in my dialect, unless some mention had already been made about him having her)/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cait48

The English is consistently wrong on the cue sentences and in the answers. Correct answers like He has more than she and He has more than she does are not accepted. You are correct--the actual meaning of the English answer you are supposed to give does not mean what I think the writers meant it to mean.

To me, "I have more than him" is what an arrogant young woman with a string of men on the line might reply upon hearing the news that one of her suitors has found another woman.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColmMoore

I tried this: Tá níos mó ná í aige.

and got it wrong. I see nothing wrong with my answer and it sounds better saying it out loud to me, if that makes sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pallethands

Why í and not sí? Is there an implied copula here I'm missing or is there a usage for it with bí? Or something else entirely?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KittDunne

So, if the intent were to say, 'He has more than she has' - we'd say 'Tá níos mó aige ná tá aicí ' ? That sounds a little odd, maybe something is missing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
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"Tá níos mó aige ná atá aici"

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