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"Yo habré vuelto."

Translation:I will have returned.

5 years ago

59 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/HolyT
HolyT
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In the past perfect and future perfect lessons, Duolingo needs to add other clauses to the sentences for better context. These tenses are rarely used in sentences all by themselves. For example:

  • Before the end of the day [future event], I will have returned. [event that will have occurred prior to the other future event]
  • Before the enemy arrives, I will have returned.
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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It's a detraction from the program's strengths. I often think that a great learning assignment would be to make the users create a sentence to logically follow the posted DL sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I had assumed that most of us do that already, Talca. As I have said elsewhere, duoLingo isn't a teaching process but a learning process. DL gives us some hints and clues to vocabulary and grammar that encourage and enable us to follow it up. And if we are stuck there are plenty of generous colleagues visiting these Discussions to help us.
I'm sure there are passive language programmes elsewhere; this isn't one of them. I know which I prefer.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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I use Duolingo EVERY DAY as a foundation to build a small vocabulary and get the general idea of the language. Duo's algorithm for fading memory works well to motivate me to repeat sections as needed until I have really learned the words. I use several other sources to obtain grammar explanations, realistic examples of Spanish usage, and natural pronunciation by real people.

One very good source can be found at www.conversationexchange.com. Here you can connect with native speakers who are trying to learn your first language. You can help each other with language questions, as well as practice speaking and listening in a natural conversation. Users typically use Skype, What's App, or other Internet-based communication that let's you talk free with people all over the world.

Another site I really enjoy is www.yabla.com. This site lets you watch videos of native speakers discussing normal everyday topics, listen to music, and view grammar lessons. The videos are arranged from "newbie" to advanced, and can be viewed with subtitles in your learned language, your native language or both. They can be stopped at any point and repeated, or you can click on a word and get an immediate definition. Yabla provides many other options to assist in learning new words.

I love Duolingo and that it is free is an amazing contribution to world society. I know Duolingo needs money to operate. I would be thrilled to pay a monthly fee for additional learning opportunities within Duolingo. Duolingo could add links to related information, reading material, recorded conversations using the vocabulary they are teaching. I won't pay extra just to avoid the advertisements, but I would pay extra to reduce the time I spend researching elsewhere for language information.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stevenat365

Especially for the future perfect tense, (in my mind) I like to add "by then" at the end of the phrase to kind of complete the sentence. Works with any context!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patcito
patcito
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how about "I'll be back"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2
Melita2
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No, patcito, that won't work. Some context: By the time you receive this letter, I will have (already) come back from Spain.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IgorHenriqueA
IgorHenriqueA
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Correct, the point is to refer to a time in the future when some other future action would be already completed

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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... or in the past.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

You are correct rogercchristie. The Future Perfect can, indeed, be used to express the recent past. Some examples:

  1. "Me habré dormido porque no oí el teléfono." (I must have (may have/might have/had probably) fallen asleep because I didn't hear the phone.)

  2. "Él habrá dejado su casa antes de las seis para llegar aquí por ahora." (He must have (may have/might have/had probably) left his house before six in order to get here by now.)

As you can see, "will have" won't work in these sentences. See:
http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/103
http://users.ipfw.edu/jehle/courses/perfect1.htm (Scroll down to the very bottom of the page.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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It was two years ago but I think I must have been thinking about Melita2's example.
Maybe it is a special case, but consider "By the time you read this I will have (already) come back from Spain".
It depends on one's viewpoint. When I am writing the sentence it hasn't happened yet, so "I will have come back" is in my future. However, when you are reading it, it will have already happened so it is in your past.
[And I didn't even have to quote Einstein's Theory of Relativity!]

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angeldeleon177

I'll be back = Volveré

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshWhitaker

I call the this overly dramatic tense. People only speak like this in english when they want to audition for Shakespeare.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolyT
HolyT
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Explain how it's overly dramatic. Perhaps you never use the past perfect tense, either? Maybe we can all just speak in grunts with hand gestures. Anything else is superfluous.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeAnettePlanette

Gestures?! Not now please when I finally got so far with spannish

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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People communicate like this when they need to be precise. It would usually be in writing (though it could be a recorded audio message) when there is no opportunity for instant dialogue to clarify the meaning.

Face-to-face (or on the phone), our grammar is much laxer (more lax?). For example:
"See you Saturday."
"Aren't you in Spain?"
"I'll be back by then."

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fokstrot

What is the difference between Yo habré vuelto and Yo habré regresado.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paul.coman

No difference, they are synonyms.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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Good question, Fokstrot. As paul.coman said, they are synonyms, and though I have read that they can be used interchangeably, I have also read that "volver" (and I'm assuming its derivatives) is considered less formal than "regresar." Perhaps that is also part of the reason why the phrase "habré vuelto" appears to be more common than "habré regresado" by about 5:1. Also, "volver" can be used to mean other things than "return" (e.g., repeat or do something again). Some of this information came from a Spanish Language StackExchange thread. The link to it is below:

Difference between “volver” and “regresar”

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BobZhurunkle

General Eisenhower as he was leaving the Philippines, "By this time next year, I will have returned!"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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Saw a couple of posts in this thread that got me a little confused about which tense to use when. If your memory needs to be refreshed on this or you never really learned it that well in the first place, you may find the following web page useful:

Choosing between Future Perfect and Conditional Perfect in Spanish

But, if you don't want to visit that link or don't have time to read, sometimes an image is worth a thousand words:

HTH

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tommopine

I hope this doesn't sound condescending but I think it would help if people, before they query the Spanish, learn English. Ours is a very strange language.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickyBerge

Is it possible to say this sentence in Spanish? I did not think you could conjugate "volver" into this tense.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

Nicky: It is future perfect tense://///habré vuelto = I will have returned/////habrás vuelto = you will have returned////habrá vuelto = he/she/it/you will have returned/////habremos vuelto = we will have returned/////os habéis vuelto = you will have returned (informal in Spain)///// habrán vuelto = you will have returned (in the rest of the world outside of Spain)/they will have returned.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Yes, it is correct, it is an irregular past participle.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/manny540266

Okay I thought TENDRÉ was "I will have"....Can someone PLEASE clear this up for me

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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The word "tener" is a verb that means "to have" or "to hold." It can also be used in other ways, but for the sake of simplicity, I'll leave it at that. The word "haber," on the other hand, is an auxiliary verb. Rather than explain what other duolingo users have already taken the time to do, I'll just provide you with a link to a discussion someone posted on this topic:

Tener vs Haber

I see that you are now at a Level 25 (¡Enhorabuena!), so you may be well past this by now, but chances are others will have this same question, so thank you for asking it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_smiles_

Since the Future Perfect can also express what "might have" or "probably have" happened -- can this also be translated as "I must have returned" in the right context?

E.g. Dorothy, unsure that her red slippers would really be able to take her home, waking up in bed. "I must have returned."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jacobspaj

For the future tense of haber, it is probably better to stick to 'will have' as a translation. There is no sense of have to, must, ought etc. I have used 'tendre que volver' with some success at making myself understood. Also, 'debere volver', but with perhaps a bit less success.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EkulTheKing

Future expresses what might be happening right now, but Conditional expresses what might have happened in the past. Since Dorothy is already home, she could ponder: "¿estaría en mi casa? ¿habría vuelto?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb
Metlieb
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The hint for "volver" is "volver" again; it doesn't show the English translation. Am I the only one having this issue?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LukasvanS

How do i translate "I would have returned" (by the time my mum comes home) for example? thanks already!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb
Metlieb
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Yo habría vuelto.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolyT
HolyT
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LukasvanS: Actually, in English, you should use the future perfect in that sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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For anyone looking for a future conditional example,

"I would have returned were I able to afford the flights".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VctorTorao

It seems like " Ya habré vuelto"...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikepedrosa

that doesn't sound right!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcooooo2004

TBH this correct answer doesnt sound like it makes any sense

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CKris7

In English I would say "I would have returned" not "I will have returned"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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"I would have" is conditional. See the comment from lisa4duolingo up the page.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/the_tornedo

is it write in english to say i will have returned ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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'I will have returned from my holiday by the time you receive my postcard.'

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobChristiansen

vuelve= (he/she/it) /goes back /turns returns/drives [she drives me crazy= Ella me vuelve loco. | ] regreso= i return | Volvió – (he/she/it/you) returned | vuelto= returned come back turned

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RubenVegas2

I will have returned sounds like it will be done in the future. I have returned sounds a lot better

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruthie-K

Wouldn't it be ''I would have returned'' Instead of ''I will have returned''?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BryceSpringfield
BryceSpringfield
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Could someone explain how "will have" fits into English? I rarely ever hear this tense in English so it's a bit confusing.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamMcC186879

This is me smiling. My DL said the correct answer was " I will have turned." So I came to the discussion page to see how "vuelto" became turned.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlbertoPen7

we can also add to Duolingo:

I would have returned

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

That would be: (Yo) Habría vuelto (conditional perfect tense).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jbykU
jbykU
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The whole construct of this lesson is forced. When would one use 'will have', it is always conditional and would be stated as 'would have'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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Not so. 'By the time you get up tomorrow, at midday, I will have fed the cat, bathed the baby and prepared the lunch. I will also have phoned by mother.'

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wilkinsonqwerty

i will have returned? what the heck! i put i have returned. that should be fine

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSeychie

We don't say this in English people...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSeychie

This grammar structure barely makes sense! I will survey all of my friends this.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

It's not commonly used, but it is real :)

"By the time you read this letter, I will have already gone..."

"By the time you get home, I will have finished cleaning the house"

"By the time supper is ready, I will have already starved to death"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSeychie

The 3rd one does make sense ;D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eddiaz00

The correct english translation to this sentence is... "I have returned".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb
Metlieb
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Sorry, but that's NOT the correct translation. Habré is the future-tense of haber and means I will have. Thus, I will have returned is the correct translation.

3 years ago