"I do not know if they have thought about it."

Translation:Non so se ci abbiano pensato.

June 9, 2013

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/lolaphilologist
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I'm surprised to see "ci" translated to "it" here. I would think that that would mean "I do not know if they have thought about us." How do we know not to say "non so se l'abbiano pensato"?

June 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/treszter
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Isn't it that if 'ci' would mean 'us' then then 'pensato' should be 'pensati'? I'm not really sure. The topic of 'ci' and 'ne' is not an area where I feel confident.

February 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Keko
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That's correct, if "ci" was "us" it would have been "pensati"

This is the difference between pensare (to think, sometimes to believe) and pensarci (think about something, with the meaning of ponderating, taking a decision)

March 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelWat541241

Could someone explain why "ci" is translated as "it"? Shouldn't it be "lo"??

June 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/treszter
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I got it from English to Italian and instead of 'ci' I proudly wrote 'ne'.

February 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/mphodges

Non so se loro ci abbiano pensato is wrong? The correct answer started non so so se...

May 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/McCaskey..12
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Yes, what is that about? Must be a mistake. I knew ci could be used but thought ne was also correct.

August 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/laurendunc4

pensarci = to think about it

September 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/kilianseavers

i agree please fix

November 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/goldy1992
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Non so so se loro ci abbiano pensato. Can someone explain this solution, why is there two so?

September 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/wiplala

must be a mistake. you can report it if you see it again

September 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Teresinha
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Now there is one "so"....

April 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sharinglanguage

Why is the same sentence, just adding "loro" wrong??("Non so se loro ci abbiano pensato.") Should we put "ci" before "loro", maybe?

October 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sharinglanguage

Moreover, the suggested answer was the same as mine (with "loro" but with "so" after "so"): " Non so so se loro ci abbiano pensato.".

October 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/efdfirefighter20

I've been complaining about things like this for awhile. Who ever designed this course seems to take great satisfaction in making things harder then they have to be. Instances like this only serve to confuse the learner.

November 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/BjrnHellan

Non so se ne abbiano parlato. Possible?

July 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkDeVernon
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I had the same question. Given that you wrote two years ago, it doesn't look as if I am going to have an answer.

November 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/laurendunc4

No, you have to use "pensarci". It's one of those very specific words--if you want to say "think about it" you have to use pensarci. There's so such word as "pensarne". Use "ne" with other verbs.

November 27, 2018
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