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"No puedo nadar."

Translation:I cannot swim.

5 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Nihongoneko14
Nihongoneko14
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Es ok no puedo nadar tambien

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BPS-PenuelO

Yo tambien

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertoRavDiablo

habla una lifeguard!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkMeyerMALP

"I'm not able to swim"--didn't pass muster.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

"Not being able to" = "No ser capaz de", even if it means the same, sometimes DL is picky like that.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Edfactor

When I hovered over puedo, the second choice was "able to". Why was that translation offered if "I'm not able to swim" is incorrect?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CapablePecan

You must have typed in, " I'm able to swim " and forgot the 'not'.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/insecuredave

I believe...In using PODER the implication is that you can't swim (or are not able to swim) right now because, for example, you forgot to bring your swimming costume. If the sentiment was that you can't swim because you never learned how to, then the sentence would use SABER instead of PODER.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deanoneer

Is "No puedo nado" incorrect?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nihongoneko14
Nihongoneko14
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Yes you can't mix two conjugations together that means I can I swim. You can only use one conjugation connected to a verb.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beatles-Musician
Beatles-Musician
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Is "No puedo nadar" and "No sé nadar" different as comparing in French or Italian?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nihongoneko14
Nihongoneko14
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Yes, they're Latin languages and have the same rules. They're different. No se nadar and no puedo nadar are different meanings.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CapablePecan

Then if they have the same rules, are they really different?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rforman4075
rforman4075
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If you can only conjugate once, does that mean 'no pueder nado' would also work?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Drew76231

No because that would mean "No to can I swim"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vincemat
vincemat
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Ruh roh

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spanishmakeup
Spanishmakeup
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a mi tamoco

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jamarl3

First time can't was not accepted for cannot

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CapablePecan

You may have typed in can’ without the T, or had some other typo.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TomDominy

Does this also mean, "No se nadar"? Do they both mean I cannot swim? Also, very often Spanish infinitives have a "a" in front of it i guess to mean "to". So when does that happen and how does it change the meaning. It seems redundant as the infinitive already means "to do something", so why is an "a" added in front?

5 months ago