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"Ellas van a andar con él."

Translation:They are going to walk with him.

5 years ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/EricCrocke

What's the difference between andar and caminar?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/malkeynz
malkeynz
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From what I understand:

  • Caminar = to walk (quite literal)
  • Andar = about a zillion meanings depending on context :P Some of them: to go out/walk/stroll/ride (or take, some form of transport)/go (well or badly etc)/go (function).

    I think of it mostly as "to go" in some of the more abstract senses of how we use it in English. e.g.:

    • How are you going (doing)?
    • I'm going out with her (on a date).
    • I'm going (out) with my friends.
    • I'm going on (taking) the bus.
    • Does the blender go (work)?
    • How does it go again?
    • Go (act) carefully.
    • The dog is going through the trash.

    Whereas "ir" is more of a literal "to go" and implies a destination or origin (except when it's used as a compound future tense).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Crystalfoot

Caminar = literally to walk Andar = more like Johnny Cash, I walk the line. We know he isn't literally singing about walking on a line.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScubaDyer

sounds like a date, to me. I think they are going to "hang out" on the andador. There are many andadores for passing date night time in Mexico.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jerobarraco

in argentina andar have that connonation too

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CedarPrince

Just thought I would comment, but I was told that the verb, "andar", is used in Mexico to mean "to ride a bicycle", or "to wander". Just thought I would give those examples too!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kiltown
kiltown
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go and walk are different verbs in English and Spanish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mtracey1844

I'm still trying to figure out why we're working with these kinds of sentences when there's already a separate lesson on "ir future".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TracyS221
TracyS221
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Yes, it's frustrating that it's not more of the proper future tense here! I don't really feel I need a lot more practice with "ir future" but I do feel I'm very short of practice on the "proper" future tense.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marchenbilder
Marchenbilder
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why isn't it possible to translate by: They will go with him

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paolomar77
paolomar77
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I too put the same, but I think it isn't accepted because go = ir and walk = andar or caminar

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/goshgollygod
goshgollygod
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"Van a ir con él" would be a better translation for the sentence you gave.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jml646982
jml646982
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I don't see ANYTHING in the reference to WALKING!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aramos2005

Where in the world does it say walk?!?!?!?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Smilinsteve7256

Why is DL saying"They are going to BE with him?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Andar can also have the meaning of "being" or "existing". Kind of "going around".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/outhuse12

Why is "They are going to ride with him" not accepted?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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I am not sure in what circumstance you can translate andar as "ride". Unless you literally go for "andar a caballo" or another ridable vehicle.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShotgunJohnny99
ShotgunJohnny99
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Y él es yo.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jairapetyan
jairapetyan
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That's what I put too.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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I tried they are going "for a walk" with him but lost a heart. I thought it was more idiomatic.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sporta-Ashura

"Ellas van a andar con él." Sounds almost like polygynism :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanTelloM
AlanTelloM
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No. That statement means in Spanish that they will walk in company of someone without it means a meeting among them.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kgb99

I wrote they are going to ride with him. As in andar a caballo.....why not?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/constructionjoe

I was thinking the same thing, but it appears that the mode of transportation preceded by "a" or "en" must accompany its use for such a translation. http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=andar

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barcelona57

How does it mean 'They will go AROUND with him'? I said 'They will walk with him ' I even looked at what they said andar meant, and when you touch andar, it says To walk!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/noperrovieja

The first time i said that were going walking with him, which is obviously wrong, but they gave the correct answer as going around with him. When I put that as the answer on the secon attempt, though, they counted it wrong and gave the correct answer as they were going to walk with him. Grrrr. They are not always consistent with their own answers. It's frustrating.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kateri214015

Fire, walk with me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/srh1056
srh1056
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Con él = Consigo?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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  • con él - with him
  • consigo - with themselves

( is a reflexive pronoun for the 3rd person, so "himself", "herself", "yourself", "itself", "yourselves", or "themselves" that is used after a preposition. With con it becomes consigo.)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John50910

Go with him should be correct. Duolingo should not count this wrong since the verb caminar was not used.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John50910

Corrected it to what it wanted, but still know they are wrong.

6 months ago