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"Recuerdo cuando vi a la reina."

Translation:I remember when I saw the queen.

3 years ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

Thank you to everyone! I always sort of blundered along with these verb form questions by translating to the "to be" infinitive form of the Spanish verb when it sounded right in English to me. Usually this worked, but it was always a mystery. Thanks again!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

How do you know whether or not to use the infinitive of the second verb when there are two verbs in one sentence?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elanaknt

You use the infinitive of the second verb if the two verbs together form one thought or action performed by the same subject. For example: ella quiere ir (she wants to go), necesito dormir (I need to sleep). These usually use the infinitive form (to ____) in English as well.

You conjugate both verbs when they are two separate actions. These are literally separated in the sentence by either a comma (like in a series of actions) or a conjunction, like cuando in this sentence. Other common ones are y, o, pero, and que.

Hope that helps!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

Thank you! This was never really explained when I took Spanish in college. I always wondered about the rules. Have a lingot!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

to add a caveat to what was said, sometimes you have two verbs together but the second is not in infinitive form. this is true with an ongoing action where you would use the gerund for (...ing) like in: Estoy comiendo (estar and comer) I am eating. Also, in the perfect tenses you have two verbs together, but the formula there is always Haber(conjugated) + Past Participle of the second verb. They are never separated by pronouns or any other word, put any pronouns ahead of haber, and negate ahead of that when necessary. He vuelto (I have returned) No he vuelto (I have not returned) Just thought I'd throw it out there but by no means any expert here. buena suerte

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elanaknt

Good point, which I neglected to mention. Participles are still not really considered conjugated forms, since they don't change with each subject, so they kind of fit with the rule I gave above. You use a conjugated verb followed by a participle (present -ing, past -ado/ido), rather than another conjugated verb, because they form one thought/action. Thanks for adding this!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

No problem, Thanks

3 years ago