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"Hij heeft paarden."

Translation:He has horses.

3 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/vimitha.pat

How would i say "they have horses" ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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Zij hebben paarden.

Even though the pronouns for "she" and "they" are the same in Dutch, the verb has different forms. From the verb you can always tell which one of the two is meant.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReneeDubuc

I have already begun noticing homophones, such as "pardon" ("excuse me") and "paarden" ("horses")

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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They aren't homophones, the difference between the short a and long aa isn't always that clear (especially when there is some specific intonation and/or emphasis), but the difference between the short o and the schwa (short e without emphasis as in paarden) is clear (to a native speaker at least). Next to that the emphasis in pardon is on the second syllable and in paarden on the first.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReneeDubuc

Yeah, I posted that 8 months ago. I realized that already. Thanks for the more grammatical explanation, though!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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*phonological

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jojotoad

It's hard to decide if its paarden or parden. I get mixed up. Help!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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It is a long aa, the voice pronounces it quite clearly, a more sloppy human speaker can make it sound a bit like a short a, but in this case parden is not a Dutch word. But maybe that fact makes native speakers more sloppy, as they will be understood anyway, which is not a given with words like for instance start (start) and staart (tail).

2 years ago