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"Je mag niet met de auto rijden."

Translation:You may not drive.

3 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/nullusaum
nullusaum
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So, is "met de auto rijden" to actually drive the car yourself or is it just to go by car, not necessarily as the driver?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bakkman

I'm also wondering about this!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/friswing
friswing
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I have the same question. Anyone know? Native Dutch?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pieter235124
Pieter235124
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A passenger is just riding along / Een passagier rijdt slechts mee.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rafmescas1
rafmescas1
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Why is it wrong "you may not drive with the car"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danglesmack

It sort of makes sense, but it's not a common sentence construction in English. We'd just say "drive the car."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewsSuzy
AndrewsSuzy
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Or even just "drive"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JPS_Originals

As a native British English speaker I would say" drive with the car" is fine. I could imagine myself saying it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Judi.MD

@rafmescas1
Indeed, what is wrong?? Perhaps there are two modes of transport available, an automobile and a truck, and the speaker is saying, "Je mag niet met de auto rijden." Otherwise, why not just say, "Je mag niet rijden"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markvanments

Exactly. Wouldn't you translate "You may not drive" as "Je mag niet rijden" as you might not be driving a car, it could be a lorry or motorcycle.

I suppose there is a slight problem as "Je mag niet rijden" could translate as "You may not ride [a horse]", so using "drive" shows that we have spotted that is a car.

But I don't think it is wrong in English to put all the information about what you are driving.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewsSuzy
AndrewsSuzy
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I wrote "permitted" but it was not accepted. I'm a native Brit and these are synonyms, aren't they? Have reported it, but....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phb2013
phb2013
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I agree with you. "Permitted" should be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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I think there is a nuance here. Permitted is more having someone allow you to. Can can mean either ability or permission. So, I know you can drive (ability) but you can't drive my car(permission). I still haven't quite figured out how much mag (moegen) covers)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewsSuzy
AndrewsSuzy
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Well said - "mag" = permitted in the sense of allowed to. And that's why I reported it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Le-trois

What is the purpose of 'met' here.

Is "Je mag niet de auto rijden" valid?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joerg9
Joerg9
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I thought "mag niet" = "must not". Why isn't that accepted?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phb2013
phb2013
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"Mag niet" would be "may not", or "are not permitted".

2 years ago