Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Tengo los sábados libres."

Translation:I have Saturdays free.

5 years ago

50 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/votrexflame

why not "I have free Saturdays"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Apebongo

"Los sábados" implies that every single saturday is free. Imagine you've been given two saturdays off at work, you would say "I have free saturdays" [tengo sábados libres] instead of "I have saturdays free" since having a saturday off is not always the case.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nake89
nake89
  • 13
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3

"I have free Saturdays" is bad extremely English compared to "I have Saturdays free"...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnaXaul

I agree with Apebongo - there is a change of meaning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Max421833

...so is "bad extremely English" compared to "extremely bad English"

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/busycat
busycat
  • 16
  • 11
  • 8

Well, I typed "I have free Saturdays" and it was marked correct... so is it good English after all or are Duolingo giving a "bad lesson"????........

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RJMhJp

I typed in "I have free Saturdays" and it was marked correct, too.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesJ.
JamesJ.
  • 20
  • 12
  • 2

I have never heard this phrase on its own. I could conceive of someone saying, "I have some free Saturdays next month."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 14
  • 13
  • 2
  • 36

It allows it now, but I agree with nake89 that "I have Saturdays free" is better. Although, strangely, I think "free Saturdays" is the literal translation of "sabados libres". I'm not quite sure how to parse "I have Saturdays free".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talonghitano

It was accepted for me on May 9, 2017. But I think "I have Saturdays free" is a much better answer.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tx91791

Because likely no one is charging you a price for Saturdays then giving you some for free.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Unapersona37

'I have Saturdays off' was accepted 1 July 2018

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulus_germanus

same here :/

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yagisan

same!!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spanielle2

my thoughts exactly

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sasha_Cn

same!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huysan
Huysan
  • 13
  • 11
  • 2

It is accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.winkler
t.winkler
  • 22
  • 21
  • 21
  • 11
  • 11
  • 3
  • 822

Was suggested for me, because I failed with "I hav free on Saturdays"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/harrycallahan

and in literal translation, why "I have the saturdays free" isn't correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 14
  • 13
  • 2
  • 36

Day names are one of the areas where Spanish and English have different rules (about using the definite article and about capitalization). "los sabados" = "Saturdays".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thvnoort
thvnoort
  • 25
  • 23
  • 22
  • 11
  • 16

Does English always drop the article before a weekday? Is that an actual English language rule? Because I almost never drop the article.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

It sounds very unnatural to use "the" before a day of the week in English, except in a sentence like "The Saturday after next" You only use "the" if you are referring to a specific Saturday.

I'm free on Saturdays. What are you doing Friday/on Friday? Did you see her on Wednesday? I cook dinner on Tuesdays.

With indefinite articles (a) you could use it like:

We should try to get together on a Saturday. She would like to play soccer on a Sunday afternoon this month.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thvnoort
thvnoort
  • 25
  • 23
  • 22
  • 11
  • 16

Thanks. I realize I also drop "the" more often than I thought. Still, in this particular sentence "the" doesn't necessarily sound strange to me at all. Oh well, it's all about context, I guess.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Objectivist
Objectivist
  • 16
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 1777

What's wrong with: "I'm off on Saturdays"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tx91791

You're assuming the sentence is about work, that's what.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 289

Nuthin'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dockeryz
dockeryz
  • 21
  • 11
  • 7
  • 2
  • 2

I have Saturdays off.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SoMuchSpace

"I have free shoes" Yeah, I'm stupid.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hakim747
Hakim747
  • 15
  • 15
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3

Well, is that a literal translation? "I am free on Saturdays" sounds better to me. And it war marked as correct.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THLu1
THLu1
  • 25
  • 111

I heard zapatos instead of sabados. I can't tell these two words apart by sound.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/somelauw
somelauw
  • 17
  • 13
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 10

"I have free on Saturdays" sounds most proper to me, but it wasn't accepted.

Edit: BarbaraMorris is right about not using "have", so my new most proper translation would be "I am free on Saturdays".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KenHigh

"I AM free on Saturdays" sounds the best to me and is equivalent to "I have Saturdays free." "I have free on Saturdays" doesn't sound correct at all, because free is not a noun, it is an adjective. Try "I have sad" vs. "I have sadness" for example. The 1st is wrong while the second is right because the "ness" turns it into a noun.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 14
  • 13
  • 2
  • 36

"I have free" isn't correct because "free" is not a noun.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KasperFeld

What is wrong with "I have the Saturdays free"? I would say it is correct english, with just a very slight nuance in meaning. And the Spanish does include the "los".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 14
  • 13
  • 2
  • 36

You're right that "I have the Saturdays free" is a possible English sentence; it could be the response to "What about Tuesday, Friday, or Saturday this week, Monday or Friday next week, Friday or Saturday the week after?".

But in English, we only say "the somethings" when we're talking about some specific, previously mentioned somethings. While Spanish (almost?) always includes the "las" or "los".

So the presence of "los" in the Spanish shouldn't lead us to include the "the" in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Highwaysta1

Saturdays OFF

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 14
  • 13
  • 2
  • 36

To me, "Saturdays off" means that I don't work on Saturdays, but "Saturdays free" means that I don't have any regular commitments of any kind on Saturdays (work, errands, meetings with friends, driving kids around, etc etc).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/7Vdelww0

I don't work on Saturdays. Ditto

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kkobylarz

Why did it tell me the answer is "I have got free Saturdays"? I don't see"got" in the sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda472793

oh, I got the suggestion "I am free Saturdays". What the hell that means?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moralesr21

Well i am most American and Mexican Well American is Fantasy violence Mexico is Full digital.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/landiskreeb

SATURDAYS ARE FOR THE BOYS

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Butterfly1663429

What is REALLY weird is that the app ACCEPTED "Saturdays I have free"!!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chao41357.

Why does "sábados" mean Saturdays when the Sabbath is on Sunday?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shaunsmile
shaunsmile
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Standard American English does NOT say "I'm free ON Saturdays." It's either, I'm free on Saturday, or I'm free Saturdays.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hungover
hungover
  • 14
  • 10
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

That is purely arbitrary. To me, "I'm free Saturdays" sounds much weirder than "I'm free on Saturdays". Also, these lessons are not necessarily American English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 14
  • 13
  • 2
  • 36

Me too. "I'm free on Saturday" is also fine, but it doesn't mean the same thing. And "I'm free Saturdays" sounds ok too, but it seems very casual, even sloppy.

I wish I knew what terms to search for so I could look this up in references of standard English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xiape

Agree -- I hear it both ways.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dholman
dholman
  • 13
  • 10
  • 9
  • 4

Can the Americans please stop insisting in caps that their versions of everything are always correct, no question, please, thank you. Fewer exclamation marks in general would be appreciated, too.

4 years ago