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  5. "Cheannaigh mé péint dhearg a…

"Cheannaigh péint dhearg agus péint ghlas sa siopa."

Translation:I bought red paint and green paint in the shop.

October 2, 2014

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

I know it's possibly slightly ambiguous (at a stretch), but English would prefer red and green paint to to the somewhat redundant red paint and green paint.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sliotar.

How do you stop your "red and green paint" from becoming brown paint?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThDonaghey

You keep red and green paint from becoming brown paint by keeping them in separate pots. Which is why the English "red and green paint" isn't actually subject to misinterpretation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dagummace

Sounds like Christmasy stripes to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dagummace

I would say the least ambiguous phrasing would be "red and green paints," and i was going to ask if the phrasing in exercises such as this was natural or pedagogical, and if one might actually usually say "péinteanna dearga agus glasa."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1450

"red and green paints" is not unambiguous - it could be referring to a can of paint that was 60% red and 40% green and and a can that was 40% red and 60% green. Two different cans of two different"red and green"s.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dagummace

Well, if you want to take it that far, the statement that I bought red paint and green paint in the shop does not specifically mean that they came in separate cans, either, nor even that the quantities matched.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1450

Cheannaigh mé péint dhearg agus péint ghlas sa siopa means that I bought red paint and I bought green paint in the shop. Neither the Irish nor the English say anything about what I do with them after I buy them, but the Irish sentence makes it clear that I bought two separate colours of paint, whereas "red and green paint" and "red and green paints", don't, as they bought leave open the possibility that the paints were mixed before I bought them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThDonaghey

I guess the question is what would a customer aware of how paint works ask a shopkeeper who also knows how paint works, in Irish. Because if you're combining red and green paint in the same container, it'll be brown before you get it home.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Would glas be preferred over uaine for paint?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

I wouldn't have thought so, but the FGB entry for glas actually lists péint ghlas as "green paint".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moira_the_Dragon

When would uaine be used?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AllieC490376

In other posts on this forum, uaine is said to be the yellowish-green colour of new grass. Apparently uaine is also used to describe the green in the Irish flag...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mikemilg

Tá sé craiceáilte i ndiaidh Mhaigh Eo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilmolleggi

Could you say "péint dhearg agus ghlas"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1450

péint dhearg agus ghlas would be very handy if you were painting stripes - one can, two colors!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dagummace

Or "péinteanna dearga agus glasa"?

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