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"Puedes ir allí."

Translation:You can go there.

0
5 years ago

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/da.razo.m

In Mexico we say "puedes ir ahí"

11
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Gracias. Me ayuda mucho oír directamente de una persona que vive en México.

8
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricky.tracy

"You are able to go there" was incorrect. Huh?

7
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/parked91
parked91
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Puedes means (you) can. "Eres" would mean "(you) are"

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

While it's true "to be able to" isn't a direct translation of "poder" (in that it uses a linking verb and adjective rather than the active verb "can"), the phrase is one of the offered translations and conveys the same meaning. Furthermore, similar sentences accept "to be able to" in place of "can" for "poder." Could anyone explain why "You are able to go there" isn't acceptable, or is it just that it's a wordy translation?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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It's correct. I guess it just isn't in the list of answers. You can suggest it if you get back to this question.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gmartins

it would be great if duo introduced words before having you attempt to dictate it

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBraxton

Such as where did the word 'may' come from. It was never introduced in any lesson.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Why not "te puedes ir alli" Subject is You. Action is done by Subject.

We just had "Me tengo que ir inmediatamente" -looks the same concept to me????

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

The me in your second sentence is the reflexive part of the verb rather than the subject pronoun. Irse (reflexive form of ir) means "to leave" (rather than "to go"). Reflexives in Spanish are confusing to me and many others.

In your first sentence, the ir is just the regular ir ("to go"). If you wanted a pronoun, it would be the subject pronoun to match the main verb puedes from poder.

And, not to confuse matters, it is the infinitive (ir = "to go") in Spanish even though it's the "simple infinitive" ("go") in English. That's a reflection of the fickleness of English, not the Spanish.

5
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I think you would want me to ask if I needed. Let's begin with the second sentence since its correct. "me"I do know has to be a reflexive pronoun to a verb. Tengo and Ir are verbs. Now I'm confused - which verb does it reflect? As I type this I am thinking you would only reflect the conjugated verb? We have two verbs with one subject "I". Do we then have one reflexive pronoun for the subject "i"?

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

So tener que = "to have to [do something]" and it is followed by a verb in the infinitive form. We conjugate the tener to its yo form, tengo. The verb that follows is ir ("to go") -- except in this sentence, it's the reflexive; the me refers back to the reflexive of ir (irse = "to leave") and it is me because the subject is yo.

One can say Me voy for "I'm leaving." It's only the infinitive ir in the sentence we're discussing because it follows tengo (tener) que.

Gosh, as I read that, it sounds confusing. I'm not sure how to do it better ...

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Your answers are mind provoking. Often I have to read them and then leave them for awhile. I comeback and then things click. I do get what you are saying I think. Focus on the infinitive in a sense because we've dealt with the conjugated verb. Me voy brings it home to me. I wouldn't have known that is all that's needed to say I'm leaving. I was confused having the two verbs and add in the "reflexive pronoun".

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Abykale
Abykale
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Grrr, I typed "over there" as a translation for allí to differentiate it from ahí, and they counted it wrong ...

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mcLur

when does "can you?" become "you may" ?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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When permission is added. Puedes ir allí, tienes mi permiso. But can and may are both poder. Just as well. We often substitute can for may.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBraxton

How were we supposed to know that. Other than you type "You can go there" and have it marked as incorrect because 'may' was never introduced as a word in the vocab. I guess this is THE INTRODUCTION.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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To know that was a rule? It isn't. The only way to learn is by doing, and this system gives you the opportunity to make attempts in a guided way. The payoff is that sometimes you learn a thing or two when it flags you incorrect. That's really a pretty big payoff.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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I learned something about the voice. I wasn't sure about the fast voice, so I used the slow one. The slow one doesn't have the S. The fast one sure does. So after typing from the slow one, I should have checked the fast one.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/12345ann

I wrote: Can you go there. Could the sentence be a question, too? (I know, there is no question mark, but besides of that?)

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Sure. Often the only difference between a spoken statement and question is a rising pitch at the end. Sometimes we do that in English.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/12345ann

thanks

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/simpsongeorge

i see why 'over there' might be wrong, but it may be right with aquí and ahí perhaps, or maybe just ahí? as i understand aquí is closeby, like something you'd point direction onto and ahí is further away like something you point at, whilst allí is not seen, such as the next town or something... Please correct me if i'm wrong, this is more of a question!

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Panhead412

I said "you are able to go there" and it said it was wrong. Isn't that the same as "you can go there"?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Should be, but more than that, it's a good translation of puedes ir allí.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OscarSprag

What is the difference between 'alli' and 'ayi'

0
Reply2 years ago