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"Tengo que salir pronto."

Translation:I have to leave soon.

5 years ago

83 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/memarielane

"I have to leave right away" wasn't accepted.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HagueAndrew

Same here, used immediately. No dice.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

or straight away - reported 14/4/15

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mishakell

Nor "at once." This one was tricky as "pronto" has slipped into English usage, but usually with more urgent connotations than "soon."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mehefin14

And then in Italian, pronto is ready or hello, the beauty of language eh lol

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

"I have to go out right away" still not accepted as of August 2016. Reporting again.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeadowlarkJ

In English when we say "pronto" we mean "right away" but I think that in Spanish "pronto" means "soon".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElAitch

Ok, but certainly the best translation isn't "I have to go out rapidly," as suggested by Duo

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daweshillroad

In fact, "I have to go out rapidly" would never be said in English. It's a bad literal translation.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DailyGrace

It also means "quickly", thus the various translations are actually correct.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidLBump

In my family, you didn't want to split hairs when it came to being told to do something "soon" -- you'd better do it right away.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeroen0980
jeroen0980
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well i think the best way to translate that is : tengo que salir de inmediato

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelPai19

yep i fell for the trap of thinking pronto meant i better hurry. lol And all my life i could have been taking my time when my dad asked my to do something. I have found this out years to late.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SveinGystad

Yes, but I have to leave rapidly was the correct translation :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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"I have to leave early" was marked wrong. Temprano is the more common word for "early," but the drop-down of pronto included "early" as a translation. What's up?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rdohd

I think it is because of the context of the sentence. I have to leave soon, I have to leave right-away. meaning the person has an urgent need. The word early does not convey that meaning in that case.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vinnygret

Um, "right away" was NOT accepted in my sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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Quickly? I know short and quickly don't have exactly the same meaning, but is it synonym in this sentence, like it is in French. Il faut vite que je sorte.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FogPop
FogPop
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There is a difference between "soon" and "quickly". "Soon" means "shortly", "about to happen"; "Quickly" has a sense of speed; i.e. rapidly.

However, according to: http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/pronto pronto, -a (as an adverb) 1) soon 2) early (peninsular Spanish) 3) quickly So "quickly" looks to be ok, but I'm not sure. I have reported it and maybe they'll look at it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eschwartz6

"Quickly" describes how you leave, whereas "soon" describes when you leave.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chaterlaine

I agree that quickly and shortly have have slightly different shades of meaning, but Spanish "pronto" can mean quickly, soon, right this very second. It all depends on the context and we do not have any.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JillJohnso14

Well - they didn't accept quickly from me either.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kapow5289

I gave the same response. Quickly seems quite sensible in context.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miney33

i don't understand why "que" is necessary here. Seems like "que" can be used in any form

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Tener que = have to It is an idiomatic expression. Tengo que leer este libro. (I have to read this book.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miney33

gracias!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/radek_1985

Just imagine that the 'que' in "tener que" is the same as 'to' in "have to". :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miney33

gracias!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/measerp

right, but that makes a literal translation, "I have to to leave soon" which I think is the confusion. Why not just Tengo salir pronto?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

"tener + que + infinitive verb" is a fixed construction in Spanish.

Tener by itself means "to have" (as in, to possess or own an object)

Tener que followed by an infinitive verb means "to have to (do the verb)"

You cannot omit the que in this construction.

Remember that things are not translated one-for-one between Spanish and English.

I have to buy a car = Tengo que comprar un coche

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NitroHades

What JuevesHuevos said was right but you also have to keep in mind that Spanish is a different language and comparing it directly to English is not exactly fair to the language

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Matthewjlpage

I wonder if we use "Pronto" in English colloquially slightly differently. We use it to mean ASAP, but perhaps it is closer to "soon" in Spanish?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mazdee

I have to leave at once was not accepted. Maybe "pronto" is not as urgent as I had thought.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeadowlarkJ

I agree. In English, we use "pronto" to mean "right away." But in Spanish, it generally means "soon."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JBaer1
JBaer1
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Thank you for your explanation. We definitely needed help from someone who is fluent. Could also provide the suggested phrasing if someone was trying to say ¨I have to leave immediately?¨ Thank you!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josef.kore

"I have to exit soon" wasnt accepted. I think it should be. I have reported it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaythemanreally

"Right away" and "shortly" seem equivalent but only "shortly" was accepted. Is there some difference that I do not understand?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ian866281

Technically (or pedantically), 'Shortly' would suggest that you are height challenged.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

Can another translation be written as "Tengo que ME IR pronto"? I was under the impression that (reflexive + IR=to leave). Am I correct? Thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Possibly.

However, your usage would be incorrect - because of the object pronoun placement "me"

You can put object pronouns before a conjugated verb: Me tengo que ir pronto

Or attached to the end of an infinitive: Tengo que irme pronto

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

hello JuevesHuevos, Thank you for your care in responding to my question. I understand your response, and though I am no expert, I thought the word QUE "separates" the 2 verbs. Therefore I believed placing the reflexive pronoun before IR, yet after TENGO, was the correct way to organize the above sentence. I hope you can tell me why Im wrong. Thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

I see your logic but I'm 96% sure you can't put the object pronoun there. It can go in one of two places and no where else, the "que" is part of a construction that goes together.

Nos tenemos que despertar.

Tememos que despertarnos.

I think those are the only two word order options for this construction (tener + que + reflexive verb)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andiness1

"Tengo que ir pronto" would translate more directly as "I have to go soon" rather than "i have to leave soon." It could be contextually important, but for the most part would be interchangeable.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deepstructure

That's interesting. I thought the reflexive form of ir was used to convey leaving instead of going, thus "me voy" means "I'm leaving."

So wouldn't "Me tengo que ir," mean "I have to leave"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanJ.Polasky

Why not 'very soon'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

That would be "muy pronto."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fioramor

My native Spanish speaking BF says 'pronto' can be used to say 'immediately'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NEGenge

"Pronto" is a sort-of-false cognate with me personally. English tends to adopt non-English expressions, often without taking on the whole original meaning - or not quite getting it in the first place. :) I think of "pronto" - used in English sentences - as "quickly." As sort of "on the double!" I have to stop and think "soon" when it's in a Spanish context. It's like my brain is translating it twice, out of Spanish to coll. English, then back out of English to Spanish again! Funny sensation!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reichenbachfall

I almost wrote "I have to leave pronto" because I'm used to hearing pronto in the English language

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardSheehan

Right. very soon might be ok too

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JillJohnso14

Could you please explain why "I have to leave quickly?" was not accepted?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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quickly is an adverb describing how one is leaving. Pronto is describing when = right now/soon/immediately. There is a fine line between the too. In conversation English, if I heard "I have to leave quickly." I would understand you to mean "I have to leave right now."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Talca, I agree with your points of slight differences in meaning, but adverbs are used to describe both how or when the verb does something.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geocheslol

sounds like my life

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricardopasa
ricardopasaPlus
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My translation should be accepted. I have to leave right away means, in English, exactly the same as "I have to leave soon".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deepstructure

As a native English speaker I would very much disagree with this. "I have to leave soon," and "I have to leave right away," are most definitely not the exact same thing. They are quite different.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoredWithDuoNow

Tengo que irme pronto, is also, I have to leave soon.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aleksandra241936

I used now and it's wrong

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reastwoodstone

Should I put went out n see what they have to say since the debacle over ' she goes out of the room without saying goodbye ' sorry guys I can't bring myself to risk a heart to test the theory.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pateamchair

Why not "promptly"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Atokirina

¡Uy, parece a la fecha no va bien!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/papabiz1

hello i am biligual

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KarstenJes

pronto is a once

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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at once = pronto

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Viezenz
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Would "I need to leave now" work as a translation?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

If it were "now," it would be "ahora."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/el-aitch

And the recommended answer is "i have to go.put rapidly." Who says that?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SrikantS87

"I have to go out immediately." was not accepted. "I have to go out soon." is what was listed as the answer. Is 'pronto' that specific?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alex713746

i put i have to leave now why is it wrong

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeadowlarkJ

“Ahora” means “now”. The owl wants you to translate “pronto” as “soon.”

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffreyCam13

"I have to go out now." Was not accepted. Please explain why not?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wandermum

I have to leave quickly

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardSheehan

It seems that there are many additional correct answers.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lechuzha
Lechuzha
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'I have to go out right away' is a lot more likely than 'I have to leave rapidly', which hasn't been said since about 1827.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

Mi familia:

"Tengo que salir pronto."

--después una hora--

"¡Tengo que salir pronto!"

--después quince minutos más--

"¡Tengo que salir! ¡Ahora! ¡Pronto!"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrittanyAn769307

I keep getting this marked wrong evem though my answer is exactly the same as the "correct" answer Duo gives. I Can't get past this level because it keeps giving me this question and marking it wrong. Please fix this Duo! April 2017

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

I thought I was having the same problem once. It was on the "Type What You Hear" exercises. I kept stubbornly typing the answers in English, when what Duo wanted was the Spanish.!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xxxChocoMilkxxx

I have to go out immediately should have been accepted :(

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

I think the problem may be that Duo did not like your translation of "pronto" as "immediately." I'll bet that it would accept "I have to go out soon."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bawallish
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I seem to be in the middle of a run of questions on this theme and I'm about to tell the lady who does the voiceover that she can go right now if she wants. I won't make it imposible salir.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/r14.cateley

"I ought to leave soon" isn't acceptable?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/finikis

I've written "now". I know "right away" could be a better answer but "promptly"??? Do people even use the word?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danmarts

Donde estan las llaves, Rose?

4 months ago