" an cat os comhair an fhir."

Translation:The cat is in front of the man.

October 3, 2014

53 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rewjeo
  • 1599

How does this compare with "Tá an cat roimh an fear" meaning-wise?

February 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

One of the meanings of roimh is “in front of”, so they could have (but wouldn’t necessarily have) the same meaning.

July 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cait48

Seeing those two words in juxtaposition sent me to my dictionary for kitty-corner, (Other versions: catty-corner or cater-corner, which I've never heard), my idiolect's word for diagonally opposite (schräg gegenüber i nGearmáinis). I found nothing. Is there a way in Irish to express that spatial relationship?

November 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Yes: “cater-corner to/from X” is fiarthrasna ó X. Interestingly enough, the “cater” in “cater-corner” is cognate to Old Irish cittach (“left-handed”, “awkward”).

July 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cait48

Go raibh maith agat. "Cittach" and "ciotach"/"ciotóg" sound much more like "kitty-corner" than "cater-corner," don't they?

July 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Certainly citt- and ciot- sound more like “kit-” than “cat-” does, but “cater” was a verb (meaning “to cut diagonally” — unrelated to modern “catering”) that goes back at least to Elizabethan times.

July 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cait48

No, no, I understand that the Irish and the English words have distinct origins. I just think it's odd/cool that the words are somewhat similar.

July 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nate_J

We say cattycorner here, that's really interesting

March 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soupandbread

In 'Ulster English' you'd hear the word 'fornenst' to mean opposite/in front of. 'The cat is fornenst the man'. Is this word used anywhere else?

January 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverCasserley

I never knew how to spell it before now and I have not heard it in years.

May 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

The OED has its headword as “fornent”, but includes “fornenst” as an alternate spelling; it came from “fore” + “anent”. It notes the word as being used in Scotland and northern England.

March 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fe2h2o

Hearing her say "an fhir" in this lesson reminded me...

Are there many words, where when they are lenited (or I guess, eclipsed), they sound the same? It's ok when you can see the word written, but if you're just basing it on what you can hear... I can just see scope for potential misunderstandings!

October 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

The eclipsis sounds are distinct from each other, so if there’s any aural confusion to be found, it’d come from lenition. After browsing for nouns for a few minutes in my pocket dictionary, I found sean (“ancestor”) and teann (“strength”), for which their respective lenited forms shean and theann could be homophones.

October 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fe2h2o

So, possible, but probably not too commonly—and context should be sufficient... Go raibh maith agat:-)

October 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EavanM

Would this be true for all dialects? Curious because I've been hearing words that end double-n, like peann, with an "ow" sound (like "ouch").

February 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

No, that particular example would not hold everywhere — as you’d noted, the “ow” sound of peann can be heard in Munster dialects.

February 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnnyblade23

Me too

April 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danoconnell55

I'm a bit confused, why is man "fhir". I thought genitive was only applicable in possessive cases.

August 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/balbhan

The genitive case really means "of X". Like French, Spanish, and nearly every other non-Germanic language, Irish expresses possession as "cat of my son", rather than "my son's cat" - cat mo mhic, le chat de mon fils, el gato de mi hijo etc. It's the same here, with "in front of the man". Possession only works like in English with pronouns.

August 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cinzia47

I can't understand the rules for the genitive in Irish. Why, when the sentence was - the library's money - was the plural "na" used but not in this case for " the man"? Is there a rule that someone could explain, please?

April 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cait48

Getting a real grammar book is key to surviving Duolingo! Here's the short version of how to say 'the':

Nom/Acc Case: an for singular, na for plural

Genitive Case: an for masculine singular, na for feminine singular, na for plural

Here's a link that may be helpful: http://nualeargais.ie/gnag/artikel.htm Look at only the first two yellow boxes. It'll take you a bit to figure out their system, but the site is quite reliable.

Have fun learning Irish!

April 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cinzia47

Thank you Cait48

April 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nate_J

"Tá an cat roimh an bhfear" would mean pretty much the same thing, right?

May 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

It could. (Roimh has more than one meaning.)

March 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZanninaMargariti

Roimh and is comhair difference????

August 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Roimh can mean “before” in either its spatial meaning (e.g. “in front of”) or its temporal meaning (e.g. “earlier than”), and its noun phrase is dative; os comhair can mean “in front of” or “opposite”, and its noun phrase is genitive.

March 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John787925

Why is it still "an fhir" in this case and not "na"?

April 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cait48

'Os comhair' is a compound (multi-word) preposition, and you have to use the genitive case after compound prepositions. 'Na fir' is nominative plural; 'an fhir' is genitive singular. You can look nouns up in the grammar section of teanglann.ie to see their declension: https://www.teanglann.ie/ga/gram/fear I hope that helps.

April 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gwyddnoschdy

The translation I got was: The cat is opposite the man. In the U.S. (an appreciable market for Irish, I'd imagine) we would never say that. We'd say: The cat is across from the man.

January 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kmradley

Oh dear, I'm having some similar confusion as well. You can say "opposite", though: To say that "the cat is opposite the man" is different than "the cat is in front of the man". Opposite: picture a bunch of people and an animals in group therapy sitting in a circle. "The cat is opposite the man" would mean that directly across the circle, a cat is sitting on a chair facing the man. "The cat is across from the man" makes perfect sense here, but it is implied that they are facing one another. Like buildings that are opposite one another on the street and so forth. "The cat is in front of the man" could mean that the cat is sleeping on the floor in front of him, stretching, lapping up milk, meowing. But it's also true in the group-therapy circle. The cat is in front of him, but also opposite him. Is this nuance the same in Irish, or is it simply better translated "in front of" and we should report that "opposite" is wrong?

January 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EavanM

I am American and I would say "The cat is opposite the man." Gee, maybe I got this from reading UK lit. In any case, like kmradley, I'm not sure how else you would express opposite-ness. What about "opposite from the man?" Does that sound better?

February 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/balbhan

I'd go with "the cat is in front of the man". You can also say the school's in front of the restaurant, as well as opposite it.

June 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/exeisen

So "THERE IS a cat opposite the man" doesn't work?

April 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ballygawley

No, because it is "an cat" which is "THE cat".

June 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/exeisen

D'oh. Thanks.

June 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lethe-DFD

Why is "The cat is opposite of the man" incorrect?

May 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1217

It's not a grammatically correct sentence in English.

May 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lethe-DFD

I am a native English speaker. I would never say "opposite" without "to," "of," or "from." You could be right, but why?

Edit: I forgot to type "is" in my comment here because I'm stupid, I don't know, but my answer definitely had it and I was marked wrong. I edited my question post.

May 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1217

"Opposite", meaning "across from" or "facing" is already a preposition - it doesn't need any additional preposition to work.

The two examples of "opposite" as a preposition listed in dictionary.com are: The guest of honor sat opposite me at the banquet
He has played opposite many leading ladies.

May 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielPere25094

The cat is across from the man is correct in english??? What the hell is that? The exercise told me it is rhe right answer...

August 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oden246

Where is the speaker from?

November 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dandelionmagic

It sounded to me like the speaker said "leat" not "an fhir", i replayed it many times, knowing that couldn't be it but i couldn't figure it out, is this one of those ones where the audio is off or am i just really far off on how "an fhir" should sound?

January 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1217

It's an fhir. While the slender r can be difficult to characterize, because it's not a sound that is used in English, the n in an is pretty clear, an the i in fhir does sound like the ea in leat at all.

January 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/irekis

why "ta sicin sa cheapaire" demands "THERE IS chicken in the sandwich" but "ta an cat os comhair an fhir" marks "THERE IS the cat in front of the man" as incorrect.

Is there any irish nuances?

August 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1217

That's an issue of English usage, not Irish. It is more natural in English to say "There is chicken is the sandwich" than to say "Chicken is in the sandwich". When the subject has a definite article, English changes, so you have to say "The chicken is in the sandwich".

August 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samterry4

Is the r in Irish pronounced the same as the d in English?

September 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1217

No. The slender "r" is a sound that many English speakers are unfamiliar with, so they sometimes (incorrectly) assign it a value of "d".

September 24, 2019

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