"Yo no sabía."

Translation:I did not know.

4 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/FigTwig
FigTwig
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Can someone explain why "I didn't used to know" doesn't work here?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mreaderclt
mreaderclt
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"Used to" vs. "use to" causes a lot of confusion, even for native English speakers, because they generally sound alike when spoken.

I started writing out an explanation, but it's late and I'm groggy from a cold. So thank Google for this link I found on "used to" vs. "use to."

I hope this explains this better than I can right now:

http://www.grammar.cl/rules/used-to-use-to.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/psifish
psifish
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I believe that you should use "use" and not "used". So, you're sentence should read "I didn't use to know".

http://www.5minuteenglish.com/mar20.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SyamkumarR
SyamkumarR
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But that too was marked wrong by DL

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

That is because "use to" is a mistaken understanding of "used to" because "used to" sounds like "use to."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I'm sure there are regional variations; I know that use is often used; the correct grammar would be used; in informal communications no-one is going to hear the difference anyway.

If I were being really pedantic I would say "I used not to know"; I'm more likely to say "I didn't know"; you may see "I used not know" or even "I knew not" in an old book(1) or poetry(2). Take your pick.

(1) Yea, the men came unto me, but I knew not whence they were. (Joshua 2:4 - King James Bible)
(2) I knew not whence they came, from sun or thunder-storm. (Prisoner. Emily Brontë. The Oxford Book of English Verse)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FigTwig
FigTwig
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You know, I think you're right. I always say it like "used" but grammatically, duh, I should be writing "use".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveHarris809825

As a UK native speaker, I have found that a safe way to negate "I used to know" is:

"I used not to know".

Passions run high on this, depending on the speaker's (and listerner's) background. Almost any other way of negating will upset someone but this seems not to offend. (You see what I did there? :-) :-))

Duolingo also accepts it.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

because it is not correct english grammar. You'd say I didnt know, or I used to know, but didnt know and used to know are not always grammatically interchangeable.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TonySitoy

When you use "DID" in front of another verb, present tense should be used for the 2nd verb. Correct way: "did not use"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JollyWolf

I'm just going on the record to state this is an awful sentence, and the imperfect of saber is almost never used in English when the statement reflects a negative.

Saying "yo sabía" or "I used to know" is acceptable in English when talking about something you knew at some point in time and cannot recall at the moment. But, while "I used to not know" might be true, it is clunky English and is much better said as "I didn't know."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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What's the difference in meaning between "No supe" and "No sabía." I know that one is preterit and the other imperfect, but I'm trying to understand the nuances of usage. Thank you!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mary626782

didn't is a contraction of did not. MY answer is correct

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RandomCanadian12
RandomCanadian12
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"I used to not know" wasn't accepted. Apparently it wanted "I used not to know"

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dimezanime

Crazy right??

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jbauer1414

Sometime I mix up the forms of past tense in Spanish. Especially when the negative form is used. I know in English, it is much easier.

When I look at "I knew" vs "I used to know", I realize that they can be interpreted as the same.

But in the negative, you can't say "I didnt knew". You can only say "I didnt used to know" (although colloquially, no one would say that in North America, no sure elsewhere) Is this an English example of where the negative form makes things more difficult? Or am I completely off on this one? Feel free to let me know. Thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KenHigh

You can't say "I didn't knew" but you can say "I didn't know" With the negative past tense you always put "to do" = did in the past, and leave the main verb in the present. Never did + past tense.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neilmalvern

I didn't know was marked wrong. But then I often get marked wrong and then the correct version shown matches exactly what I have put. ???

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SWilliamsJ
SWilliamsJ
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If sabía = used to know, used to taste, or knew - then how it is the answer "I did not know" and not "I didn't use to know". I've read a few discussions below but I'm still not clear on the discrepancy. URLs are pretty fine so long as it provides a clear explanation. Gracias!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/STARBANDIT

This could be "yo no supe" just as easy these ambiguous english sentences are killing me

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dtUyaD
dtUyaD
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Same exact exercise, twice with the masculine voice, twice with the feminine. What's up with that?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Henga69
Henga69
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¡San Marino!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CliffBowma

Many more English speakers say ¨I didn´t used to know" than ¨I didn´t use to know.¨

http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=2756

Professor Lieberman´s analysis that ¨used to" is atomic and acts like a single word seems right to me. In any event, the English translation should permit the more popular usage.

5 months ago
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