"Mio padre fa l'avvocato."

Translation:My father is a lawyer.

June 12, 2013

52 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mariur89

My father does the lawyer?! Now that's why he's always working late..

February 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/TheBareBears

Haha! Love your comment!

December 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sevan1.
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Lol that's how I explained it too

May 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/judycucin
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December 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/LINBUR0100

When I was learning Spanish, the explanation that was given is you can either express ones life's work as a vocation/avvocation, or as a profession/job. To express it as a vocation/avvocation, you use the construction "Mio padre fa (does) l'avvocato", which would literally translate as something like "My father, he does the lawyering". To express is as a profession/job, you use the construction "Mio padre è un'avvocato." This is more like what we do in English, and translates very literally as "my father is a lawyer". I find when constructing these sentences, it helps to think of the "to do" definition of "fare" instead of the "to make".

It seems that in the Romance languages (well, at least for Spanish and Italian) you can express any profession using the "fare" method, whereas in English we tend to only use this construction for professions like teaching, nursing, serving, etc. Basically, the professions where what one "does" is also what they "are".

July 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Shamshoomi
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Well said Linda. Grazie!

May 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AliMargot

Where's the 'un'?? I can only see 'l'avvocato' which I thought meant 'the lawyer' not 'a lawyer' (or attorney in this case).

July 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Che-Figata

There are a couple of ways to talk about professions in Italian. You can either use 'fare' (to do/make) or 'essere' (to be). When you use 'fare', this is the equation: fare + (definite article) + (job) = 'to be a + job". When you use 'essere', this is the equation: essere + (job) = "to be a + job". When using 'essere', you don't use the indefinite article like you do in English. So, you can either say "Mio padre fa l'avvocato" or "Mio padre è avvocato". They both mean "My father is a lawyer".

May 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/judycucin
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Very helpful, grazie!

December 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jim960910

I agree

November 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Nata989

Maybe this has already been answered here and I didn't understand it, but can someone please explain why the use of 'fa' turns l' into a?

April 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/IamRegine

fare + (definite article) + (job) = 'to be a + job". EXAMPLE: faccio l'avvocato = I am an attorney

October 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/SuzInAZ1950

Explain it to me too!

November 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Che-Figata

There are a couple of ways to talk about professions in Italian. You can either use 'fare' (to do/make) or 'essere' (to be). When you use 'fare', this is the equation: fare + (definite article) + (job) = 'to be a + job". When you use 'essere', this is the equation: essere + (job) = "to be a + job". When using 'essere', you don't use the indefinite article like you do in English. So, you can either say "Mio padre fa l'avvocato" or "Mio padre è avvocato". They both mean "My father is a lawyer".

May 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/anirbansam2

Can anyone say why when I write advocate it says wrong?

September 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Che-Figata

It's most likely wrong because l'avvocato = the lawyer. When you're referring to an advocate in relation to the law, I believe it is "l'avvocato difensore".

May 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Che-Figata

For your reading pleasure, my university textbook "Da Capo" says this:

The indefinite article is omitted after the verbs ESSERE and DIVENTARE before unmodified nouns including profession, nationality, religion, political affiliation, titles, and marital status.

Giancarlo vuole diventare medico = Giancarlo wants to become a doctor.

Enrico era avvocato; era un bravo avvocato = Henry was a lawyer; he was a good lawyer.

Lei era cattolica e lui era protestante = She was a Catholic and he was a Protestant.

È sposato o è scapolo? = Is he married or is he a bachelor?

Note: FARE + definite article + profession is an alternative to ESSERE + profession.

Enrico era avvocato. Enrico faceva l'avvocato.

May 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/nanotech18

How would you say "My father IS the lawyer" - If i'm not trying to tell someone what my father does, but rather that the guy over there, the lawyer, well that's my father - my father IS the lawyer.

July 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ajstronach

I would think it would be: "Mio padre è l'avvocato" (as opposed to: "...è un avvocato" which would be "...is A lawyer").

--Mio padre è l'avvocato (là) = My father is the lawyer (overthere)

--Mio padre è un avvocato/Mio padre fa l'avvocato = My father is a lawyer.

August 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Sam975254

Why not solicitor or barrister?

January 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Che-Figata

I believe solicitor, barrister, and attorney are all synonyms for "lawyer".

May 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AijaTSS1

I heard: Mio padre ha l'avocado

August 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ziggKogg
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I think I might have already asked this before...... But why is it not "the attorney", does it have to do with the verb "fa"??

  • EDIT Looks like it becomes an "a"; sort of answered my own question.
June 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/dnovinc
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"Mio padre fa l'avvocato" o "Mio padre è un avvocato" those are two sentence constructions that I know of for professions. They both translate to "My father is an attorney."

Just remember it as two possibilities:

  • fare + definite article + profession (Lui fa il dottore.)
  • essere + indefinite article + profession (Lui è un dottore.)
June 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Jones_Rick
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Grazie.

November 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sandeepa2
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Grazie dnovinc

November 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Shaylan-Young

Am I getting this right? I may not be understanding the below comments, as well.. but is the use of 'fare' or 'fa,' in this case, used to indicate that he is A lawyer just as the alternative 'Mio padre è un avvocato'? Are they both meaning the exact same thing and are interchangeable? Are they both acceptable in the Italian language? (as, I believe, dnovinc stated).

April 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Che-Figata

Yes, using 'fare' is an idiomatic way to talk about professions but it's still valid and common. There are a couple of ways to talk about professions in Italian. You can either use 'fare' (to do/make) or 'essere' (to be). When you use 'fare', this is the equation: fare + (definite article) + (job) = 'to be a + job". When you use 'essere', this is the equation: essere + (job) = "to be a + job". When using 'essere', you don't use the indefinite article like you do in English. So, you can either say "Mio padre fa l'avvocato" or "Mio padre è avvocato". They both mean "My father is a lawyer".

May 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/lukman.A
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I thought it was, "mio padre va all'avocato". Cavolo me.... :(

April 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Cactus_Man

That's my father goes to the lawyer.

October 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/angela_may123

i didn't get it.... is anyone native speaker here??? please explain it...

May 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Che-Figata

You don't understand why the sentence is structured like that? If so, I hope this helps. There are a couple of ways to talk about professions in Italian. You can either use 'fare' (to do/make) or 'essere' (to be). When you use 'fare', this is the equation: fare + (definite article) + (job) = 'to be a + job". When you use 'essere', this is the equation: essere + (job) = "to be a + job". When using 'essere', you don't use the indefinite article like you do in English. So, you can either say "Mio padre fa l'avvocato" or "Mio padre è avvocato". They both mean "My father is a lawyer".

May 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/etiennegonnot

why do we say : "mio padre" and not "il mio padre" ? Is there a rule for that ? Thank you

September 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/lukman.A
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It's special for Family.

In Italian, we don't need to put the definite article again only before the singular family noun. You don't need to say "il mio padre" but "mio padre". And also,

mia madre/mamma

mio fratello -- i miei fratelli

mia sorella -- le mie sorelle

mio marito

mia zia --> le mie zie

...etc

October 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Cactus_Man

I still don't understand why they put "fa" in it. Can someone please explain this?

October 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/IamRegine

fare + (definite article) + (job) = 'to be a + job". EXAMPLE: faccio l'avvocato = I am an attorney

October 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/FraulienMisha

In this sentence l'avvocato is given and in Italian La is used for "The" before feminine words but in translation it is showing "an advocate" as a right answer, the converted into an how?

November 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Che-Figata

I'm sorry, come again?

May 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/carolfair

I don't understand why l'avvocato is used for an attorney?????????

July 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Che-Figata

As far as I know, and correct me if I'm wrong natives, but l'avvocato means attorney, solicitor, barrister, and lawyer.

May 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/tony.moret

This makes no sense. L'avvocato should mean "the lawyer" yet this crazy program says it is a lawyer. Aaarrggh.

August 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Che-Figata

This "crazy program" is actually correct. There are a couple of ways to talk about professions in Italian. You can either use 'fare' (to do/make) or 'essere' (to be). When you use 'fare', this is the equation: fare + (definite article) + (job) = 'to be a + job". When you use 'essere', this is the equation: essere + (job) = "to be a + job". When using 'essere', you don't use the indefinite article like you do in English. So, you can either say "Mio padre fa l'avvocato" or "Mio padre è avvocato". They both mean "My father is a lawyer".

May 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/FlameMonarch

I always knew my father was an avacado.

March 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/erez-schatz

L'avvocato is "the lawyer", not "a lawyer"

August 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Che-Figata

Yes, that is correct, but only if you translate literally. There are a couple of ways to talk about professions in Italian. You can either use 'fare' (to do/make) or 'essere' (to be). When you use 'fare', this is the equation: fare + (definite article) + (job) = 'to be a + job". When you use 'essere', this is the equation: essere + (job) = "to be a + job". When using 'essere', you don't use the indefinite article like you do in English. So, you can either say "Mio padre fa l'avvocato" or "Mio padre è avvocato". They both mean "My father is a lawyer".

May 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Tiffany621379

Are we sure this isn't the word for avacado?

January 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Che-Figata

Haha, close, but not. Avocado = l'avocado.

May 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Juicebox241
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il mio padre e un avvocato e dio :)

June 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/nuovaforesta

Isn't lawyer an Americanism for solicitor?

August 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Elena187243

Mine does the apple. Or whichever fruit is in season.

October 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Peggy632846

I wrote my father is a lawyer and got it wrong??? Why isn’t it un’ instead of l’?

March 22, 2019, 12:58 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Buena-Onda

Because the way they express this in Italian literally means “My father does the (work of a) lawyer”. It’s not a literal translation from English.

March 22, 2019, 1:05 PM
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