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"My sister is my attorney."

Translation:Mi hermana es mi abogada.

5 years ago

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/shraeye
shraeye
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I'm going to disagree that one can say 'mi hermana es mi abogado'. That sounds like some gender confusion.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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Searching the more common "ella es mi abogada" gives 24,800 google results and "ella es mi abogado" gives only 7. It is probably wrong to use the masculine here. I filed a report on it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Canuck617

Good looking out filing the report.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dwarus

I agree as well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timish88

i think im going to agree with your good self there sir/madam. how can abogado possibly be right in this instance?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maudbenoit

after that trip to Sweden

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jin__wu
jin__wu
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It's a permanent change too (es instead of esta)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RockinAbs

Yeah, how can the person's SISTER be masculine? Clearly a mistake is you ask me..

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1An9u4931

I had the same comment. My female sibling is my male attorney? I don't think so.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Conisbrough

an abogado is a male lawyer.......how can a persons sister be a male lawyer?????? There is gender confusion here!! How can my female sibling be my male lawyer???????

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cinzi.11

Hi Conisbrough! I am italian but I'm studying Spanish at university. In Spanish and Italian there is the distinction beetween male and female...I am sure you know this. In this exercize "hermana" means "sister". And in Spanish you have to do the accordance between "hermana" and attorney....and so, if hermana means sister, you have to translate attorney as "abogada" because abogada is too female, exactly as hermana as female! You don't never translate by English because you can fall in confusion. Think in Spanish only.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lord_Snotty

I agree this doesn't look right has anyone had any feed back?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I have read that women's occupations aren't treated consistently which adds to confusion. This reference gives us some insight.

"For example, a male dentist is el dentista, while a female dentist is la dentista. "

So from this example I would choose

El abogado = lawyer

La abogado = lawyer (who happens to be a woman)

La abogada = woman lawyer (which is acceptable in places)

Los abogados = lawyers (men and women).

I hope this helps.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola rmcgwn: Professions that end in "-ista", yes, can be masculine or feminine - just change the article. But "abogado" I don't think so. I usually try to defend Duo, but on this one, I think the owl is wrong. Female lawyer is "abogada", male lawyer is "abogado". I checked several dictionaries just to be sure and I could find no reference to "la abogado". Chau,.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
tejano
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I am quite surprised, but it appears the Owl may have a point:

http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/3535/abogado-abogada

Guess I'll hold off reporting this one; they no doubt hate me in the owl nest, anyway.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
tejano
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Hola, Lisagnipura:
Though she is no longer associated there, the first comment was from "Heidita," who formerly was a moderator at SpanishDict. She is a native speaker who, if I remember correctly, taught or teaches English/Spanish in Madrid. "Dunia" is a native speaker from Barcelona, and the third comment was from "Lazarus," also a native speaker, who taught Spanish in the UK and is something of a wizard of Spanish grammar. So, no, they are not students 'like us.' :-D
But you are right; there's nothing official or dispositive about these comments. They did, however, suggest there is some flux to all of this, particularly given the comment about "medico." So... given a little digging, I came up with this from the A New Grammar of Modern Spanish (John Butt and Carmen Benjamin, 1988):

1.1.7 Feminine of nouns referring to professions:

  • The improving status of women in the Hispanic world has produced linguistic problems since some feminine forms of the professions originally had pejorative or comic overtones or denoted the wife of the male, cf. el bachiller (someone who has passed the equivalent of the baccalaureat), la bachillera 'blue stocking', el sargento/la sargenta 'sergeant'/'battle-axe' (i.e. a fierce woman), el general/la genera/a 'general'/'the general's wife'.
  • Consequently formal language tends to make nouns ending in -o which denote professions invariable: el/la abogado 'lawyer' (counsel) (la abogada, originally 'intercessionary saint', is widespread in SA); el/la catedrático 'professor' (la catedrática is gaining ground); el/la medico doctor (la médica is spreading, but may sound comical); el/la miembro 'member' (of clubs: el socio is said of men and sometimes even of women, but la soda may mean 'prostitute').

  • El/la ministro 'minister' is common, but la ministra is increasingly acceptable. Both la primer ministro and la primera ministra are used for the feminine of el primer ministro 'prime minister'. The former is more common, though El Pais writes la primera ministra, which logically ought to mean 'the first of the women ministers'.

  • In some circles in SA la jefa is an accepted feminine of el/la jefe 'boss', but it may sound comical in Spain though its use is increasing.

  • Other nouns in -o may be regular: el arquitecto/la arquitecta 'architect', el biOlogo/la bióloga 'biologist', el filósofo/la filosofa 'philosopher', el politico/la poiltica 'politician', el sociólogo/la sociologa 'sociologist', etc.

  • However, forms like la arquitecto, la filosofo may be preferred and are common in respectful language. .
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Gracias.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redpops
redpops
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Gracias

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola Tejano: Thanks for the link, but I think the comments there are just from other student learners like us, so are not "official". The debate goes on, though,on how to handle female titles for traditionally male professions. It will take years probably before the Royal Academy publishes the "official" changes, if any. Chau.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thestoryfiend

Thank you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/awesome234

I think if choice 1 is correct it should be "Mi hermana es mi abogada"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DenaBaldwin
DenaBaldwin
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In the US female actors often choose NOT to be called actresses, the implications here being that actresses are different (inferior to) actors. Maybe In spain female lawyers are choosing to be called abogados.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hannah15lee

reported this to Duolingo. Hope they change it. This is really wrong

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/poisonsilvy

I am a native french speaker, learning Spanish and English and for me both translations make sense because we can say exactly the same in french.

Ma soeur est mon avocate or Ma soeur est mon avocat

Not very long ago, women were not allowed to work and many professions don't even have a feminine form but gradually we add a e (female genre like a in Spanish) to feminize a a few professions.

If your baker is a women you will say la boulangère (for a man it is le boulanger) because women can sell bread for a very long time.

For a female dentist,or lawyer, you can equally say un ou une, because it is recent profession for the women (in centuries).

But if your wife is a bricklayer, the feminine form does not exist even if she is the most beautiful girl in the world!

Maybe it is a bit strange for English people since gender is not a problem and I don't know if the Spanish language follows the History as in France but I would be very interested in learning more about that...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fauna1

I think Duo is correct in that abogado means lawyer whatever their actual sex is, just like actor is now used for male and female. Duos 'choose all the correct answers' are often tricky or even trick questions...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicisaran

Like everyone else here apparently, I want my heart back that I lost even though I put in the right answer >:-(

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BalzsSzab4

It seems we cannot agree on this topic. I do understand that people started to use the wrong form "la abogado" since they felt that abogada has a negative sense but do they have an official book of spanish spelling? Where we can check that this kind of mistake has been made official? There are many examples when some common mistake becomes official after a while but is this a mistake or has been already made official.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bryn1953
bryn1953
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Looking at the feedback here ( I only put abogada too) this is a bad exercise for Anglo Saxons learning Spanish as it relies on historic precedent not evident in the Anglo Saxon world of the last few years.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dianna1808

I agree. Either the abogado is masculine, or it is feminine and abogada. Where is the sense here?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonnie.sjoberg

So artistas are always artistas, no matter their gender, but lawyers are gender benders? Can I say Mi hermano es mi abogada?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cjriera

Lawyers make their own rules ;p

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola Bonni.Sjoberg: No. You would say, "Mi hermano es mi abogado".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizabethdickey

This is wrong. It mixes the genders up.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
tejano
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It is not necessarily wrong. It is a sign of a language somewhat in flux, as English has been (to a greater extent) over the last 40 years of so, with regard to matters of gender. Why would we think Spanish society immune from the same forces that have sought to change language in the English-speaking world? Please see the quotes above from A New Grammar of Modern Spanish: "The improving status of women in the Hispanic world has produced linguistic problems since some feminine forms of the professions originally had pejorative or comic overtones or denoted the wife of the male [...] Consequently formal language tends to make nouns ending in -o which denote professions invariable: el/la abogado 'lawyer' (counsel). "

This may arise from women who have entered the legal profession considering (or finding) it disadvantageous to list themselves as "Abogada" in professional journals or phone directories. (Are there no chauvinistic types in Madrid or Mexico City who, needing an attorney, would shy away from calling "López y Martín, Abogadas?") In a sense, this is a response to the same rationale that has made "Ms." a standard honorific in English, and has us speaking of "chairpersons" and the like.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TONYANDERS2

status and language flux has nothing to do with it the sister is feminine then the lawyer is feminine, if u r teaching it the right way and letting us learn slang later

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeeDeeBug

Even though I am often frustrated when something like this crops up, I appreciate the opportunity to read the discussion and to learn & understand more about the language. Apparently, there is no one "right" way. Furthermore, when you travel to different countries, you will find they have different ways of saying things. It is good we are being made aware of it, so we don't get annoyed when dealing with real people.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
tejano
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"Status and language flux has nothing to do with it," and (if) "the sister is feminine then the lawyer is feminine?" Wow, those are pretty authoritative statements, but do you have some evidence to support them? Surely, to dismiss something as "slang," you must have some reference handy to dispute the comments of rmcgwn (above), the discussion on spanishdict, and the authors of The New Grammar, right?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola TONYANDERS2: When you say "you", do you mean Duolingo? If so, you need to report it under "Report A Problem". This page is just for discussion with other learners like yourself.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mariella77

Mi hermana es mi abogado? Hermana=abogada. Hermana no abogado.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tiffany_first

I see all the comments explaining and I understand but if there is two translated answers, how come only one is listed at the top of this page?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ddesgagne
Ddesgagne
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Hmmm...I don't think that's legal...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ebbin

I believe this to be correct....................mi hermana es mi abogada, (while) mi hermano es mi abogado

4 years ago