Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"She is her real mother."

Translation:Ella es su verdadera madre.

5 years ago

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 13
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

4/14/14 I wrote real (in front of madre); it was not accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/resurrectus

Me too but got accepted it was not ur lucky day

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emiirose

What is the difference between "verdadera" and "real"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jb4292
jb4292
  • 16
  • 10
  • 7
  • 2
  • 2

My guess is that verdadera means true and real means real.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dirkrol.
Dirkrol.
  • 22
  • 11
  • 10
  • 28

It is almos the same, actually in spanish ypu can use both of them in almost ecery case.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nada3.Hama

Can i say "madre verdadera?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristianPaul321

Se entiende, pero se escucha raro.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kdammers
kdammers
  • 23
  • 15
  • 14
  • 3
  • 29

Por que?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pawan_chand
pawan_chand
  • 25
  • 18
  • 9
  • 506

I wrote "madre verdadera" and it was accepted. 16/05/2017

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/machtibor

This is a very useful sentence if you ever plan to play in a Mexican telenovela.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AwkwardCactus

Is verdader@ one of those adjectives that change meaning when its in front or behind the noun it's describing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pepe0001

I prefer to say "madre verdadera". It sounds better.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AutumnAkin1
AutumnAkin1
  • 19
  • 16
  • 15
  • 15
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 382

Verdadera was not one of the dictionary hints (for me anyway) it gave me real (doesnt that mean royal?) It also gave me de ley and autentico. I put ella es su madre autentica and it counted it wrong. It told me real was the correct one and then ant the top of this thread it uses verdadera which does make more sense but why oh why didnt they but that in the hints??

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Orb
Orb
  • 18

Would that be an acceptable answer here?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Olaszv

I tried it, it was accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MotherBatch

Why not real?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Drocket

Real works if you put it after madre, but not before. Verdadera seems to work in either place. I don't know why...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angel804314

I don't know when to place an adjective before or after the noun...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aweeks009

It usually goes after but in this case it marked me incorrect. Says before

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/katangerine

Can actual not be used in place of real or verdadera?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pepe0001

actual mean current, not real

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ronniebrasco

Ella es La madre real?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmyC38045

How come in this sentence the adjective, in this case, "verdadadera" can be put before or after the noun? In this case, the noun being "madre". When does one know what order to use/place adjectives? As well as, when does one know the correct placement of words in a sentence that shows possession? From what I remember from my middle school/high school Spanish any sentence, phrase, title using an adjective, etc., was "connected" by de, del or de la, de las, or de las...And the adjective or what the subject/noun was possessing always came after of or of the. So it was easy to remember where to place the adjective Example of an adjective describing a noun, we were taught: Estados del Unidos, which of course, literally translates to the states of the united (the adjective); yet actually translates to United States. And it was easy to know where to place the words in a possesive sentence, an example of possession,one of my friend's first and middle name is María de los ángeles, again, literally, Maria of the angels, actually, Maria's angels...So knowing where to place the adjective or the subject and what it was possessing was simple and easy to remember. But, with Duolingo, I don't see much of this

So, anyway, out of all of my friends, Maria has the most unique name, but she said, she is not good at explaining possesive or adjective/s placement in sentences; and I should ask here. She said, with her being Puerto Rican/American there was practically no difference than Spain's Spanish vs. someone who speaks different ways/dialects of Spanish, as she said, like in Cuba or Mexico, etc., especially with Spanish/Cubano or Mexican slang. So, as she put it since Duolingo teaches Spain's Spanish, that Duolingo should be teaching all the ways to use the Spanish word for of. But, to reiterate, my Spanish teacher used to say, Estados del Unidos, or just Estados de Unidos...So the "side-bar" questions are: Why would she just say de? Wouldn't del be needed too; and why is it just Estados Unidos now- when did it change? Or was she just saying it wrong all these years? And then of course my main questions, :)... Please, don't forget to answer them too. :) When to know where to place the adjective or adjectives in any type of Spanish sentence, wheter it is a statement, question, exclamation, etc.? Since in this above sentence, I' m referring to, Duolingo said both translations of either using the adjective before or after the noun were correct....And the "other main theme of this passage" is: What is the correct way to say or write any Spanish sentence using possesion? Is de, del, de los, or de las, still being used as much as it used too? It doesn't seem so in Doulingo; and if of is being replaced or phased-out more, what is it being replaced with?

I would like and prefer to hear first from people that actually grew up in Spain, speaking Spanish as their native and first language...Yet all comments referring to the above questions, will be welcomed. Thank you

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
  • 22
  • 20
  • 15
  • 8

Phew, there's a lot in here. Let's pull it apart.

In your first paragraph you talked about "adjectives connected by de + article". But that's not entirely appropriate. Adjectives alone cannot take articles, and they rarely use prepositions. What you were talking about were possessive structures and compound nouns. Like in your second example, "María de los ángeles". María is a proper noun, and ángel (angel) is a noun. There are no adjectives here, but you can say that the construction "de los ángelos" behaves like one. The English translation would be "Maria of the angels" (two nouns in a possessive relation), or "the angels' Maria". It's a bit weird with proper nouns.

"Estados del Unidos". Hm. That doesn't make much sense, even if only from a grammar standpoint. Del is a contraction of de and el, but unidos is a plural word, so it would need to be "de los". "Estados de los Unidos" would be "States of the United", with "united" being a plural adjective-turned-noun, a group of people. It isn't really sound.

"Estados de Unidos" makes only marginally more sense (the states of united?), but it's still not the name of the country. It is and always has been "Estados Unidos (de América)". In this construction, unidos works like an actual adjective, directly modifying a noun without the need of any preposition or article.

To make a short summary, you need to learn the difference between a noun that's modified by an adjective (the pretty driver) and a compound noun (the taxi driver), where you just mush two nouns together. The same difference exists in Spanish: adjectives are just attached to nouns (la conductora bonita), and compound nouns are expressed with possessive de constructions (la conductora de taxi - literally "the driver-of-taxi").

Other than in compound nouns, de possessions are used with, well, possessions. "My uncle's house" is "la casa de mi tío", lit. "the house of my uncle". They are not often used in this course, since they can get awfully long, but they are pretty common in more formal circumstances. Just remember that there is no "genitive 's" in Spanish and you have to express most kinds of possessions with "of".

Now for adjective placement. The general rule is that descriptive adjectives are placed behind the noun, except when they aren't. :)
Here is a helpful list with rules for adjective placement, but there's a different approach that I like more: if it's subjective, it gets placed in front of the noun. And numbers, too. A common acronym to help classify which adjectives (and numbers, too) can commonly be subjective can be found in the acronym BANGS:

  • Beauty: bonito, feo, hermoso...
  • Age: joven, viejo, nuevo...
  • Numbers: un, tres, mucho...
  • Goodness: bueno, malo...
  • Size: grande, pequeño, largo...

Some of these adjectives change their meaning slightly, depending on where you place them. This also adds to the "subjectiveness" explanation I gave above. My favourite example: A "viejo amigo" is an old friend, one that you (personally) have known for a long time. An "amigo viejo" is an old friend, one that has lived (objectively) for a long time.

I hope that clears some issues up that you have or had. :)

Also, Duolingo does not really teach Spain's Spanish (español de España :D ), but Central American. I suspect it's specifically of Guatemalan variety, since the founder of Duolingo, Luis Von Ahn, is Guatemalan. It uses coche for "car" (Mexico uses carro), it does not teach vos forms (an informal "you" in some Central American countries and in the Southern half of South America), and it does not teach the vosotros form (the plural informal "you" used almost exclusively in Spain. But it strives at least to accept any Spanish variety for its translations. It's quite a task. :´)

Also, to be clear, I'm not a Spanish native. I'm a learner as well, but I have a good sense for grammar and do a lot of research. I'd suggest you do the same if you have problems. For instance, Reverso Context is a great source to look for translations of literature examples, and to see how common a certain expression is.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KinanHabbal
KinanHabbal
  • 22
  • 21
  • 21
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 10
  • 9

I wrote real and it was accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adder3
adder3
  • 25
  • 25
  • 1627

Why not de ella?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
martinlus
  • 25
  • 10
  • 1384

Madre auténtica not accepted! Humph!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanSchre1

Not accepted 5/19/2015

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dwallace

Looks like DL has been watching EastEnders.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JessicaBurde

Question about culture: In English among people who are adopted it is frowned on to talk about someone's "real" mother (which is usually used by well meaning folk to refer to the biological mother and is seen as insulting or dismissive to the adoptive mother--ie, the one who actually raised the adoptee and with whom the adoptee has a mother-child relationship). Does anyone know if madre verdadera is common or accepted among adoptees in Spansh, and if so to which mother it normally refers?

9 months ago