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"She has a child."

Translation:Hun har et barn.

4 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Kyukiou
Kyukiou
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I ended up typing "Hun har en barn" hoping for the correct translation to be "She has a child" I would like to know why ¨et¨ is used here for ¨a¨

---Thanks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xneb
Xneb
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Danish has 2 genders, common gender (n-words) and neuter gender (t-words). There isn't really a reliable pattern for which is which, but here is a post about determining the genders of Danish words and the patterns that are there

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kyukiou
Kyukiou
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Oh ok. So no matter what, when describing " a child" it'll always be written as " et barn" ?That's what I'm getting in terms of the Rules about "en" and "et". Thank you for the link. I definitely will be saving it under my "Study of Danish" folder. :)

Also gave you a lingot for a helpful resource :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaid.
Jaid.
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When you learn nouns in Nordic languages, don't learn them as «barn» or «mand», learn them as «et barn» and «en mand», just as you would learn the gender of a noun in French or German.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kyukiou
Kyukiou
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Thanks.

At the time I didn't know that, but it's been 8 months since I took some Danish and have studied German quite a bit. But I agree with you completely! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaid.
Jaid.
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I did not exert the effort to study up on your profile to see how active you were, but figured the input could perhaps still help someone, since Germanic languages seem to be challenging for English- and non-speakers, and it might help someone else, if not you. Great to know you got it worked out!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edgar737555

How do you use "er" and. "har" as has, in english?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaid.
Jaid.
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«Har» is in English «have», «er» is in English «are».

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xneb
Xneb
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Just to add, sometimes in Danish you can use "at være" for the perfect tenses (lacking a better name off the top of my head). It's used for verbs which suggest movement (usually but not always). For example: "Jeg er blevet (noget)" = "I have become (something)"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edgar737555

Thanks Jaid, but in the dictionary says "ER = is, are, has", Could you help me with it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaid.
Jaid.
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In Danish verbs do not have the same variety of conjugations as in English. All present tense subjects use the same verb conjugation. So «er» would apply to «jeg, du, han, de, det, etc». «Er» can also function as an auxiliary, just like in English (I am finished, I am angry, etc). The «has» that your dictionary mentions is probably the verb's auxiliary function.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edgar737555

I go it, thank you Jaid!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alex389108

Nothing

1 year ago