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"Nosotros sabemos nadar."

Translation:We know how to swim.

5 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AK.
AK.
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Why not "We can swim"? In other sentences it accepts "can" for "saber" in the cases when we talk about actions.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bovinecow
Bovinecow
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How would you say, we know to swim then?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

"We know how to swim" would actually translate as "Nosotros sabemos cómo nadar" (but that sounds a bit odd in my opinion), what you ask would be translated as "Nosotros sabemos nadar", same as "We can swim".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaspet

And what would be "we know swimming"? Or is it wrong english in the first place?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnHatchell

"We know swimming" would be "Conocemos nadar" but that wouldn't make any sense in Spanish or English. Always use 'saber + inf." whenever your saying "I know how to..." The "how to" is unnecessary in Spanish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

I have never heard it, but maybe some native could help us out? >_<

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Salxandra
Salxandra
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I hope I'm following this discussion properly.

This sentence was tough, and I attributed it to an idiomatic expression. As a native English speaker, in my experience, it would be unusual to say anything but "know how to swim". I can contrive situations to make "I know swimming" work, but it would be a rare statement.

My understanding is that in English, whenever you are trying to say that you know an activity, you would say "I know how to swim." "I know how to run." , "I know how to drive a car", "I know how to break into a house" etc. Indeed, "I know how to speak Spanish."

Or, you could say "we can swim" which has almost the same meaning as "we know how to swim. Pretty much all contexts that have "I know how to swim" could have "I can swim"

I was presuming that in Spanish, it's "se nadar", "se correr" , etc. (I am not sure how to say the other ones in Spanish)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

yeah, because of the English (rather than the Spanish), with saber + infinitive the "how to" is built in.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Thank you, SAlxandra :]

When I studied English my teachers told me "I can [verb]" was the correct way to say it, but I have encountered the "I know how to [verb]" lots of times when I read texts in English. The only way I can think to use "I know swimming" is with something else after that: I know swimming is healthy, we know swimming here is dangerous, etc. (Sorry, Jaspet, I did not think of that before). Is there other ways?

In Spanish you mostly say "saber + verb in infinitive", as you said: sé nadar, sé correr, sé conducir (un coche), sé cómo colarme en una casa, etc. Sé hablar inglés = I know how to speak English (the literal translation would be "sé cómo hablar inglés", but as you say of "I know swimming", that would be a rare statement).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Salxandra
Salxandra
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@Babella Thanks for the translations. I'm going to write them down. :)
Also, I must apologize for lacking accents. I really have to figure out how to type them on my computer.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidHoefer94

I thought 'nadar' also meant 'nothing'. Couldn't 'we know nothing?' be accepted?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hacu.
Hacu.
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"Nothing" is "nada" - not [nadar], which is a verb that means [to swim].

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kekistanese
Kekistanese
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what about "we know swimming" ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hacu.
Hacu.
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That sounds (at least to me) more like you know "of" swimming - that there is such thing/ activity called swimming. Not that you'd actually know How to swim yourself.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

@ SAlxandra: No problem and no worries about the accents! :]

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/limenchilli

so far saber + nadar was always in the alternative solutions as "i/he/she/you can swim" and suddenly i am marked wrong when i translate it that way! Not fair!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skirkk
skirkk
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Does 'Nosotros sabemos a nadar' also mean the same thing?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quick_silver_

Agree with others. Can is accepted in other cases but not here.....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nataliasjesus
nataliasjesus
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¬¬ We can swim should be accepted :/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LiamLionUK

Why is "cómo" not used here? "We know to swim.. (in case of xyz)" is quite different to "we know how to swim".

2 years ago