https://www.duolingo.com/Brando727

Casual spoken Spanish

All languages have a spoken version (informal) and a standard (formal). I am already accustomed to casual Brazilian Portuguese speech and even speak that way myself. However, I am unaccustomed to casual spoken Spanish and desire to improve that. What are common things in casual spoken Spanish, such as phonetics and grammar? Thanks : )

4 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Raynwl
Raynwl
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in Spanish is spoken in many countries, so many dialects. for example in Chile, we say: tu eríh, tu hablaí, tu caminaí. or in Argentina is vos come en, vos sos, vos hablás, vos caminás. sometimes chileans speak as argentines because we are neighbors, or in Mexico, they speak different, or the word hueón o weon (chilean word) in Argentina is boludo and in Mexico is guey. I don't know others examples but I just want to say 1st choose a country and then learn the casual version.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brando727

Thanks, very helpful. I'm familiar with voseo. Also, the hueón thing shows another feature. I've heard medial b, d, g, and v fall silent sometimes and the fact hueón is the informal pronunciation of huevón proves this. I'm wondering if these letters also fall silent if they're at the beginning of words if the word before that ends in a vowel?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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A while back I found this cool link looking for common words in Spanish. Español puertorriqueño . It's a wiki page en espanol.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brando727

Gracias y buen trabajo con su nivel en español. Do you know anything about simplification of grammar in Spanish (like ir + infinitive for the future tense)?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leo_rockway
leo_rockway
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Ir + a + infinitive for future tense is the only kind of future used in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Hearing simple future is really an oddity.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brando727

Really? Wow, that's interesting. Thanks : )

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arglab

Hi, how are you? Each country have different dialects. You can read "Che Boludo: A Gringo's Guide to Understanding the Argentines", written by James Bracken. It's a very funny (and accurate) book about Argentine "slang" vocabulary. ¡Saludos!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brando727

Good, thanks. Sounds like casual Spanish is more words than grammar, huh? Hey, can you help me with this one thing with Spanish: what exactly does lo que mean and how would you use it?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arglab

Remember that pronouns are words that refer to a noun. Relative pronouns are called "relative" because they are "related" to a noun that has previously been stated.

The relative pronoun "el que" (and its related forms) is used to refer to both people and things. Note that there are four forms to accomodate singular and plural, masculine and feminine: el que, la que, los que, las que.

Mi tía, la que es profesora, viene a visitarme hoy día. My aunt, the one who is a professor, is coming to visit me today.

Las mesas, las que son de plástico, son baratas. The tables, the ones that are made of plastic, are cheap.

Mi tío, el que es taxista, llegará pronto. My uncle, the one who is a taxi driver, will arrive soon.

Mis pantalones, los que son viejos, son muy cómodos. My pants, the ones that are old, are very comfortable.

Another set of relative pronouns can be used in place of el que, la que, los que, and las que:

el cual, la cual, los cuales, las cuales

These are not commonly used in everyday conversation, and are generally reserved for written Spanish or formal oratory.

When the relative pronoun refers to an abstract idea, use "lo que."

Lo que quieres no existe. That which you want does not exist.

No comprendo lo que ocurre. I do not understand that which is happening.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brando727

Ok, thanks, that makes much more sense. Great explanation, btw : )

4 years ago
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