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"You had come from the city."

Translation:Ustedes habían venido de la ciudad.

0
5 years ago

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Dudeney

and why not 'Tú habías llegado de la ciudad' ?

15
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deathwing4528

llegar is to arrive, and venir to come.

11
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnthonyFal1

according to spanishdict.com, 'llegar' is also 'to come'

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Markwalk
Markwalk
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And surely if you have arrived from the city you have come from the city. In this context 'arrived' and 'come' are synonymous. That being so, it seems reasonable that in this context venir and llegar would also be synonymous.

8
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cringy

That may be because in English "come to" and "arrive at" can be synonyms (when the speaker is at the same place), but "come from" is not synonymous with those.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dudeney

Here is a slight aside, but interesting nonetheless:-. I gather that the sentence "If you go, I'll come with you" would not be translated as "Si vas, vendré contigo" but would have to be translated as "Si vas, iré contigo". In such a situation, the two people are starting from the same place and so both are "going" together. In English we might just as easily use "come" or "go" in the second part of the sentence but I understand this not to be so in Spanish. Comments?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dougconnah

In the multiple-choice, "llegado" is also deemed correct.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryamo

It wasn´t for me. http://www.imgur.com/5T4Vvla

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

It wasn't for me either

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hawkeye57

not for me either :-(

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MetalGear95

it' more natural to say to venir in spanish

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MagdaleneAnne

This would also mean "you had come from the city." The only difference between this and the accepted answer is that "tu" is informal and singular whereas "ustedes" is plural and formal in such situations that a distinction between this and "vosotros" is made. A specification on the number adressed with "you" would be helpful. My profesora always says "you all" for plural and just "you" for singular, for example.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

That something you should report. There's a separate flag for that. Generally DL accepts both informal and formal forms as long as their used without any grammatical errors or typos. ¡Buena suerte!

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

They're (I mean, typo)

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dudeney

Surely they can both mean 'to arrive' or 'to come'? My understanding is that a Spaniard would be much more likely to use 'llegar' rather than 'venir' in such a sentence - perhaps an hispanohablante could comment?

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AliT.Firef
AliT.Firef
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The difference presumably would be that 'venir' could be either temporary ('you had come from the city on the night train') or something more like a description ('you had come from the city and didn't know a cow from a bull', though that would seem odd in past perfect, frankly). 'Llegar' could only be the first kind.

0
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sporta-Ashura

oops. no 'venido' as a hint showing.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gigiwatson

It is correct

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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DL suggested Vosotras habíais venido de la ciudad" (even though that wasn't what I said).

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/max.brown.

Why is "habías venido del ciudad" incorrect please?

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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"ciudad" is feminine. It should be "de la ciudad".
"del" is a contraction of "de el".

3
Reply21 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/matthewjru

I believe the sentence can be interpreted as both familiar and plural, you all

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stonedmoon

why not Tú has venido de la ciudad?

0
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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It is the wrong tense.

"Tú has venido"  is préterito perfecto  - "You have come".

"You had come" is "Tú habías venido"  - pluscuamperfecto .

See the conjunction table for venire  at http://www.wordreference.com/conj/ESverbs.aspx?v=venir

0
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim294818

How do I know to use tuviera versus habia?

0
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Both can be used in compound verb phrases to translate the English word "had." But that's where the similarities end. The difference is between "having to do something" (where there is a sense of need or obligation) vs. using the helper verb "had" as part of a perfect tense.

In this drill, we are using the past perfect tense "had come." This is not saying you "needed to come." It's merely describing something that "had happened." Thus, you would use había and not tuvo or tuviera.

Note, tuviera is in the subjunctive mood, while había is simply indicative. Thus, the two appear under very different circumstances as well.

Here's an example for using tuviera in a verb phrase:
"If only you did not have to go home" - Si solo (usted) no tuviera que ir a casa

Here's another example that doesn't use a verb phrase:
"I wish you had a car" - Deseo que (usted) tuviera un coche

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Reply2 months ago