"Il cuoco ha il proprio coltello."

Translation:The cook has his own knife.

June 12, 2013

78 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/josh2934

How did we know the use of 'own' was necessary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itwing

il cuoco ha il propio coltello" the knife only can be the cook's knife.

il cuoco ha il suo coltello" the owner is the cook or maybe another third person.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sally-Helen

Which word makes it his knife and not her knife, confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoeM.

Hi Sally-Helen, Proprio references the subject, so in this case 'proprio' translates as 'his own' since the subject of the sentence - the cook (il cuoco) - is masculine.

However, the 'form' proprio takes is dependent on the noun following it. For example, consider the following sentences:

La cuoca ha la propria tazza. The cook has her own cup.

Il cuoco ha i propri polli. The cook has his own chickens.

Hope this helps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lorenzolly

but what if the cook is a man, and we are referencing his tea. Would it then be "il cuoco ha la propria tazza?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/moltodaniele

Yes that would be correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lorenzolly

moltodaniele: grazie a lei.


[deactivated user]

    Grazie a Lei


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MPS3181

    I understand this, but why with some of the questions that use the word "proprio" does the answer not use the word "own"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patrick747417

    Sometimes "own" is implied and sometimes it's not. In this case "The cook has his knife" means that he is wielding it right now, whereas "The cook has his own knife" means that he has a knife that is his and no one else's, and doesn't imply that he has it in his hand at the moment.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 3076

    I don't see how it implies whether or not it's currently being used. The only difference between "his" and "his own" is that "his own" emphasizes that Gary has Gary's knife and not John's. Just "his" is ambiguous as to exactly whose knife it is.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 3076

    It should. That could either be a Duo glitch or a contributor oversight.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Punkmom

    According to my Oxford Beginner's Italian Dictionary, the word "cuoco" can also be used in a female form, "cuoca," for female cooks. (As an aside, Duolingo has not taught me that.) If there is a place in the given sentence here that would tell us it's "his own knife" and not "her own knife," that would be it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lexablackbird

    Yeah there seem to be certain professional titles that are fixed gender, like barista or guardia, and others with m and f forms. Guess you just have to learn which are which.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 3076

    I would say "his" knife because "il cuoco" implies the person is male.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonathanPu626026

    Exactly, I thought it was their knife because a cook can be male or female


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Viverator

    why can't i say "the cook has THEIR own knife"??:(


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 3076

    All else being equal, Duolingo prefers translations to be as strict as possible.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sonia7313

    I have heard "proprio" used in so many different ways. So confusing :(


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KPyrzyk90

    That's because "proprio" has many uses.

    For example: E' proprio lei! = It's really her

    Non proprio = Not quite

    Proprio no = Not at all

    Il proprio dovere = One's own duty

    Lavorare in proprio = To be self-employed

    It can be confusing :(


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rickydito

    KPyrzyk90: Thanks for laying it out clearly for us.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/macchiagodena

    Also, in regards to kprz comment, proprio is also used in a sarcastic, "really".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mel__Carter

    It means "my/her/his own"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PB_Bandit

    I don't understand why it has to be he/she or his/her own knife. Speaking of the cook as 'The cook' sounds gender neutral. When I read the above I think "The cook has their own knife."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leia429367

    Im italian and I would never say 'proprio' as 'his own' but I'd say 'suo'. So it would be 'il cuoco ha il suo coltello' which makes all the sentence much more fluent


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caterinabella

    "Proprio" - to me - makes me think of "proprietary", or "property" indicating to me that the knife belongs to the cook. Same with "poprio" cena; the diners are eating the dinner that belongs to them.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sjeng

    could it not have been "the right knife" or the "proper knfe"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AernJardos

    It's more closely related to property/proprietary (that which belongs) than proper (that which is correct).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pennantao

    Why was the word 'his' omitted from the sentence?Wouldnt "Il cuoco ha il suo proprio coltello" make sense?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 3076

    It only makes sense to you because you're accustomed to the rules in English. In Italian, "propri*" is "one's own" and does not combine with other possessives. Different language, different rules.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/victoriadi17

    okay so this is where confussion steps in . "sei propria bella" means you are truely beautiful ,right ? so how can "il cuoco ha il proprio coltello" mean the cook has his own knifes ?? i was convinced that propria /proprio meant truely and not "his own. her own" i am so confused. someone please help me.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarunasP

    What is the difference between "his" and "his own"? I dont see any at all...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 3076

    "His" can be ambiguous. Let's say Alex has a knife and Bob has a knife. If I say "Alex has his knife", whose knife does he have? But if we say "Alex has his own knife" then there's no doubt.

    It can also be used for emphasis, like "He has his own knife, so he doesn't need yours."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M_C_Q_N

    I think "their own knife" should be accepted as gender is not specified


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M_C_Q_N

    I think "their own knife" should be accepted as gender is not specified


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miguelagom1

    can I use propio as ´its´ instead of ´his´ or ´hers´?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 3076

    Yes, you can use it for "It has its own thing" the same way you use it for "[Person] has [person]'s own thing."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dave12341

    what's the difference between il proprio and i propri? plural?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 3076

    Yes.

    il proprio - one's own singular masculine thing
    i propri - one's own plural masculine things
    la propria - one's own singular feminine thing
    le proprie - one's own plural feminine things


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.a9r6oV

    I love you for this thank you i was so confused


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hannah506876

    According to the translation duolingo does (by hovering mouse on a word) "proprio" translates to "real", "very" and "truly". It says nothing about "her own"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 3076

    It's a cognate of "proper". Think of it as something being "properly" someone's property.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcy65brown

    Hannah, when I tap on "proprio" at the top of the page, it takes me to a page that says "really, truly, exact." But then gives examples using "own." Check it out. :-)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ben_hutchins

    In another example proprio is defined as really. When clicking it is shown as very or really. Yet it's used his own. This makes no sense.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 3076

    proprio is cognate to "proper" or "property" or "proprietary". By usage, it means "one's own". When translating loosely, different phrasing can mean more or less the same thing.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/T.Catharina

    I found a mistake there (or I think so). It wrote to me it is "The cook has her own knife."... But "Il cuoco" must be a masculine noun, or is that really right?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 3076

    Yes, "il cuoco" is a masculine noun. A female cook would be "la cuoca".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kim1947

    where is appeared the word "his" it is not in original text


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hrynisak

    what would make it, its own knife, instead of his own knife?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 3076

    There are more contexts for "He has his own knife" than "It has its own knife". But both are valid.

    It would not be correct, however, to say "He has its own knife" or "It has his own knife". When you use "own" it must refer back to the subject, not anyone else.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gina656894

    I wrote the correct answer and the app marks it as incorrect. Why does this happen and how to fix it?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 3076

    You need to either copy and paste or take a screenshot of your entire answer so we can see it ourselves and confirm that you did write the correct answer without any errors.

    If anything like this happens again and you have carefully confirmed that your answer was in fact valid and free of typos, you'll need to hit the little flag icon before you move on and report "My answer should be accepted". If enough people make the same report, then the volunteer course conributors will look into the matter and decide whether to add that translation to the prompt's database.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liv3346

    My answer was right


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/persephoneshf

    I got this one wrong for putting HIS own not HER own, but it looks like I've got it right from this thread!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 3076

    What was your full, exact answer? Odds are you had an error somewhere that you just didn't see.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FarahK778

    I did the same sentences and it said wrong but i have unlimited hearts in this lesson!!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 3076

    If it marked you wrong, then you had a mistake you didn't notice. From now on, please either copy and paste or take a screenshot of your full, exact answer so we can help you see the real reason why it marked you wrong.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karen486706

    I got that one right you said it was wrong


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helene144823

    his own( not its own) warum wird das nicht angezeigt??????


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helene144823

    his own( not its own) warum wird das nicht angezeigt??????


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paolo336608

    Could this also mean the cook is using the correct knife for the job? (il coltello corretto)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laurence190672

    Why is my answer corrected as it is identical to the correction?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laurence190672

    Again, I am told my answer is wrong when I wrote exactly what the right answer is. It's getting annoying


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanDp5

    I type the exact sentence and still wrong


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jay303427

    How do we know the cook is a man? The hints say "its own" knife.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ValeriaOlmedo

    The words it offers are wrong

    Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.