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"Aprender poesía es un buen ejercicio para la memoria."

Translation:Learning poetry is a good exercise for the memory.

5 years ago

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mikebrill

What is wrong with "To learn poetry is a good exercise for the memory"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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I put learning, but I'm with you. What you wrote conveys the meaning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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Nothing. It has been accepted as of Nov. 2015.

And I personally prefer it; it's more poetic.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrownsvilleMark

And, To learn... was not accepted as of April 2018. Don't know why they went backwards on this one.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MiaLanguages
MiaLanguages
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Yeah, "to learn" didn't work for me either.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CoconutMermaid

Didn't work for me either. "Learning" is probably the most common way to say it, but "to learn" is still correct, technically. If we were learning English from Spanish, I could understand why they would be more apprehensive about allowing that phrasing, but for native speakers, they're pretty interchangeable.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeccaEdnie

Well today, 5/4/2018 it is not accepted to say "to learn poetry.....etc"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iris150201
Iris150201
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I got it wrong today (8/31/18) for using "to learn."

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paradoxmo
paradoxmo
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I guess there's nothing particularly wrong with it, but most people would use the gerund rather than infinitive in subject/noun position because it is easier to understand. I guess using infinitive as noun is more acceptable in comparisons such as "To fail is to learn".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DennisKayK

That's a good question. It was counted wrong for me July 2018

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DennisKayK

Wouldn't learning poetry be "aprendiendo la poesía "? Why have the ING ending if you don't use it?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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You may want to scroll back through the discussions on this page. Spanish frequently uses the infinitive when English uses the ing form of the verb (gerund). It's one of those things you need to learn to speak good Spanish.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackbarrjo
Jackbarrjo
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It doesn't work as an English sentence. The construction in English requires the gerund (not the same thing as the Spanish gerundio). Spanish uses the infinitive form as the gerund English uses the present progressive

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Necrofantasia

It is grammatically incorrect; Spanish grammar is different than that of English; since the verb isn't subject to a noun, it remains as 'aprender' though it really does mean ' learning'

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mattcolor
mattcolor
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It is grammatically correct in English to begin a sentence with an infinitive. In this particular case the infinitive acts as a noun.

Reference: http://www.sinclair.edu/centers/tlc/pub/handouts_worksheets/grammar_punctuation_writing/phrase_infinitive.pdf

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bespokeenglish

Although (at times) it is grammatically correct to use an infinitive to start a sentence, it is more usual to use the present participle of the verb when it is the actual subject of the sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrownsvilleMark

Some people may be confused because it is bad form to start a sentence with a preposition (as Churchill is said to have said, "With a preposition, one should never start a sentence.") and "to" is a common preposition -- but not when being used with an infinitive. After all, "To be, or not to be..." not "Being, or not being..."

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Don't you mean "different from" that of English,,,

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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Both are correct, depending on your dialect. I have also heard different to. Unless you are sure the writer is not a native speaker, or has asked for help, please don't correct English in the comments on a Spanish learning site. 03-25-14

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmartinyoung

Agreed. I wish Duo would follow that advice. This game only dings me for my English, and English is my first and primary language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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If you're sure your English is correct, report it. They are still correcting translations. Also, there are some good pedagogical reasons for disallowing some seemingly good translations - where both English and your target language make a distinction in very similar sentences/ and or words, for instance. I would expect them to disallow I am making exercises at the gym even though that is a direct translation, and is grammatical, it isn't semantically correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abrahamj256

Why is this definite article one that needs to be said in the translation? Is there a rule for that? "...good exercise for memory" seems a better translation in my opinion.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Forget the rules on this one. It's a case by case thing. We used to say "The Ukraine". Now the article has been dropped. Some people say "this is good for the feet", some say "this is good for your feet", some say "this is good for feet".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FilipFilip17
FilipFilip17
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I’m not a native English speaker, but I don’t think you have to use the definite article in this case. At least according to Google, see here.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom285301

I just got this wrong for saying good for memory and not good for THE memory.

Are you specifying a memory in particular? Wouldn't both be correct?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrendaDobb

I agree. To add the article before memory refers to a single memory

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

just an fyi: DL also accepts "Learning poetry is a good memory exercise."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/speedier

Excellent, but it doesn't accept "........... exercise IN memory", which is in much more common use than " ................ exercise FOR memory". See below:

93400 hits https://www.google.co.uk/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&rlz=1C1CHFX_en-GBGB561GB561&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=%22exercise%20in%20memory%22

28500 hits https://www.google.co.uk/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&rlz=1C1CHFX_en-GBGB561GB561&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=%22exercise+for+memory%22

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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What this sentence really wants to say is "learning poetry BY HEART is an excellent exercise for the memory." Or "MEMORIZING poetry is an excellent exercise..."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pickedup

This sentence makes little sense.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fire-Horse27
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4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SophiaGrun

I wrote "Memorizing poems is a good exercise for the memory." Do you think that should be acceptable? In my opinion it best reflects the meaning of the sentence even if it is not a word for word translation. "Memorizing poetry" sounds weird to me, "Learning poetry" even more so. And the singular "poem" doesn't fit at all.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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Well, that might work, except that Spanish has a perfectly good word for to memorize - it's wait for it - memorizar. When Spanish has the same distinction English has, we probably ought to go along with the distinction, instead of trying to get creative. The two aren't really synonyms in either language, although there is some overlap. So, your sentence would be Memorizar poesia es .......

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SophiaGrun

Okay, thank you very much.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tomas-francis
tomas-francis
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Can this mean "learning poetry is good exercise for the memory"

If not, how would you express that in Spanish? Is it possible to say "apprender poesía es buen ejercicio para la memoría"? (without 'un')

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

I must have reported this ages ago and have just received (August 2017) a message from Duo to say it is now accepted as a translation. It doesn't sound right without the "un" in Spanish to me but I'm not a native speaker.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jakebeamish

I don't think this sentence needs the 'the' – "…a good exercise for memory" seems more natural.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillBarbour

"It is a good exercise for the memory to learn poetry" seems right to me.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelRos591172
MichaelRos591172
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Why is "learning poems...." not accepted?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael393898

To learn is not accepted on June 10th. If the gerund is required why then use the infinitive in the question? ?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Heather16457

To learn is still not accepted.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wjaime

The definite article (the) isn't necessary here as it is not a specific component but moreover, sounds completely un-natural

1 month ago