"Oibríonn na fir sna portaigh."

Translation:The men work in the bogs.

4 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LaylaKnowe

people dont work in the bogs or 'sna portaigh' they work on the bogs or 'ar na portaigh'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverCasserley

in my youth and later in life I always worked IN the bog. Bloody hard place to work in too!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaylaKnowe

true that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ciaratiara

http://www.teanglann.ie/en/fuaim/oibrí

Curious about pronunciation (again, sorry) :)
ulster: ib-ree conn. eyeb-reh muns. ob-rig

thanks again.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/poblach
poblach
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There is a mistake in the notes section. I will report it but am putting it here also so that people are aware. Tá na dochtúirí san ospidéal The doctor is in the hospital. This should be 'The DOCTORS are in the hospital.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/underwood.jones
underwood.jones
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By "bogs" do they mean toilets or swamps? :P

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

The peat bogs is what they're referencing with portach.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lostcarpark

Is "sna" a contraction of "sa na"? Would the later be incorrect?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baloug
Baloug
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"sna" is a contraction of "ins na", "ins" being a archaic/dialectal form of "i", just like "sa/san" is a contraction of "ins an". Both of them are mandatory (a bit like French "du", "des", "au", "aux", which cannot be uncontracted).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikeinkerry

Listen very carefully and you will hear an extra "i" between "fir" and "sna". Is this a glitch, natural mystery, intention, or something else?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

It's a physical manifestation of the fact that your tongue has to change position between pronouncing the "r" in "fir" and the "s" in "sna".

It's also possible that she is stressing the "fir" to emphasise the slender "r", taking care to enunciate it because it is not an easy sound for learners to catch (though that would be a little bit out of character).

1 year ago
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