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https://www.duolingo.com/noegvl

esposo vs marido

¡Hola! I was studying the family lesson in Spanish and came across these two words; esposo and marido. They both mean ''husband''. I was wondering what was the difference. In French, we also have ''mari'' et ''époux'', there's isn't really a difference and it doesn't really matter in what context we use it. So is it the same, or do you have to use one in particular for certain contexts? Gracias

3 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/nicoqk
nicoqk
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Son sinónimos, significan lo mismo. Marido es usado con mas frecuencia (al menos en Argentina). Un dato: Cuando una pareja contrae matrimonio, el Juez de paz dice "los declaro Marido y Mujer".

También existe una manera legal de decirlo, se utiliza para realizar trámites formales: "Cónyuge" Este término se aplica tanto para el hombre como para la mujer. "El cónyuge" y "La cónyuge"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ceciale74

tal cual, se podría agregar que en algunas regiones marido se usa comunmente cuando no hay unión legal, yo no estoy casada (vivo en pareja hace años) y tengo marido, no tengo esposo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicoqk
nicoqk
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También. Esposo ya casi no se utiliza.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nadya222
Nadya222
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Estoy de acuerdo contigo:

"...cuando no hay unión legal, no estoy casada: tengo 'marido', [pero] no tengo 'esposo'..."

He escrito algo más, aquí:

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/27391533

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

Good question, I was wondering about that myself. This SpanishDict.com forum post says that they're largely interchangeable but it varies by region: http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/177709/when-would-you-use-esposo-and-when-you-you-use-marido

  • One commenter says marido doesn't necessarily mean married, but esposo does. I guess the equivalent in American English would be spouse/partner for marido.

  • Another commenter says that it's the other way around.

So uh, either way you slice it, there's your difference. I just don't know which way it goes!

Edit: And apparently "marida" doesn't mean "female spouse," it means "he/she/it combines." http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/marida

Also there's "conyúge" for "spouse"? http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/c%C3%B3nyuge

And "mujer" can also mean "wife"? http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/wife

This is even more interesting than deciding what to call my husband!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/indigobloom

I can't help but wonder if this is how the trend of men calling their wives "their woman" was started :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nadya222
Nadya222
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And, this trend (of calling one's common-law wife "their woman") was actually started a very long time ago!

Case in point: There are accounts of William Wallace (of Scotland) having a battlefield conference with the French-speaking wife of King Edward I "Longshanks", (13th century England), wherein this 'queen' talked with Wm. Wallace and referred to having heard about "your woman". Wallace, the fierce Scot leader, corrected her and stated that he and his wife had secretly married (married by a priest) in a Scottish field, to keep her from being forcibly taken (and slept with) by an English nobleman on her wedding night. This doctrine of "jus primae noctis" was vigorously advanced by that badman, "The Longshanks", in order to 'breed the Scots out of existence'.

(The point is this: they were secretly married!)

So, as you can see, even Wm. Wallace corrected the English queen's view that he, Wallace, had only "his woman": instead of her being his real--and legal--wife.

Wallace had trust in the sanctity of legal and proper marriage (i.e., the institution of marriage).

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evgeny89005

noegvl, At least they sound so similar as they do in your language. In mine we have a word which means "husband" or just can say "my man" which has the same meninga in the right context.

1 year ago

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