Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"She is an artist like her mother."

Translation:Ella es una artista como su madre.

5 years ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Linguismo

I was marked wrong for 'ella es artista'. I had a similar thing on another question when I was marked wrong for lack of article, nurse I think it was. I thought professions didn't carry articles in Spanish. Please can someone tell me the exceptions?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola Linguisimo: When a profession is not modified, no article is used. If the profession is modified, use an article. In this example "like her mother" is the modifier; therefore, they used the article. HOWEVER,,,,Duolingo is not always consistent on this and some native speakers say it doesn't matter, article or no. "Book-learning" says yes, the rule is "no article with profession by itself"; "yes, article with modified profession". Actual use may vary.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miza713

DL now accepts "Ella es artista.. ."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MiguelB5

It is also correct to say "ella es artista" so you can report it; as to the rule about professions you mentioned, it's not really a rule, articles are just 'optional' with professions. I hope it helped!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

Linguismo: I agree. I reported it. You should, too, so if Duo gets enough reports, maybe they will change it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

como su madre is a prepositional phrase with 'como' being the preposition. Therefore madre is the object of the preposition and not a direct object that requires a personal 'a'. And no the personal 'a' is not translated into english like you would with 'to'.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeorgeKrue

For the previous question I had: "Ella ve a su jefe como a su padre". Why is the personal 'a' used in that case but not this one? Their structure seems very similar.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I did find a reference "a noun linked by como to a previous noun which itself has a personal a, or a pronoun standing in, usually also takes personal a (although it is often omitted colloquially if there is non ambiguity).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeorgeKrue

Thanks! So, "Ella ve a su jefe como su padre" would be considered ok?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StacyBursuk

Why don't you need to use the personal "a" here? I'm still having trouble with this rule. I put "como a su madre."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

Stacy: The personal "a" is only used when the direct object of the verb is a known person. In this case, "madre" is not the direct object.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/juju67

I was also wondering why you don't need the "a" here.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rkuprov

Why can't I say 'Ella esta' instead of 'Ella es'?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Matt.91

This is when (Ser vs. Estar) comes into play. Both mean "to be" In this sentence you use the "Ser" form of "es" to describe that she is an artist like her mother "Ella "es" una artista como su madre". "Ser" is used with elements pertinent to your or others identity, physical description, personality and character, nationality, race, gender, profession, origin, What things are made of...

In this case her being an artist is part of her identity and that is why you use "Es" instead of "Esta" For more information on when to use "Ser" and "Estar" check out this link:http://www.drlemon.com/Grammar/servsestar.html#.UmVhiZStxps

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OneVerce

Wouldn't it be "Ella es una artista como a su madre?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola OneVerce: There is no need for the "a".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

Quoting "deactivated user" above: The personal "a" is only used when the direct object of the verb is a known person. In this case, "madre" is not the direct object.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alistair-goodwin

I'm having trouble with como. I eat, how? And now 'like'. Is there any more meanings out there to steal my hearts?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

How is with the accent mark: cómo. Without the accent mark, it can mean "as" or "like" (in the sense of "as") or "I eat" (the 1st person singular conjugation of comer in the present indicative). It's usually fairly easy to figure out through context.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola alistair-goodwin: I recommend: Google/Translate; SpanishDict.com/translate; www.wordreference.com/English_Spanish_Dictionary.asp‎, www.wordreference.com/, education.yahoo.com › Reference; or many other good online translation site, or a good old-fashioned printed Spanish/English dictionary. I use the Gran Diccionario Oxford, but there are many others.‎

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miza713

Also, "comó" is the third-person past form of comer (e.g. "He ate")

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lamarechal

For me, (I began to learn spanish castillano in France) we have to say :"como a". Is the american spanish different for this item ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/5teveO
5teveO
  • 17
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9

why does artista seem to be feminine in singular, una, la, but masculine in plural los where i have been marked wrong for putting las artistas? Anyone know?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrHazard
MrHazard
  • 23
  • 23
  • 11
  • 7
  • 4
  • 4
  • 168

I had this question too. I think this is the answer (but it would be nice to have a native speaker affirm or correct this):

Unlike "una persona" which is always feminine, "artista" is male or female. In this sentence it is obviouly female, but "un artista" and "los artistas" is also possible in other cases. (I guess if you were marked wrong, Duolingo wanted the general "los artistas," which could mean either male or female artists—or Duolingo is wrong. You'd have to have a bit of context.)

You will find many examples of "el/los artista(s)" if you Google it.

4 years ago