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https://www.duolingo.com/bjorseth

New translation page

The new translation page doesn't allow me to add my translation if someone has come before and received 100%. As a result, a literal translation blocks my offering. Or, someone else might have a good translation, but I think mine might be better. It takes some fun out of the process, which, frankly, is why I do Duolingo every day.

4
5 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/BCEagle
BCEagle
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Just worked with the new system last night and this morning. I don't like having the translations shut down either. I am translating for my own enjoyment, so I'd like the opportunity of putting in my 2 cents worth even if it is never seen by anybody. I also saw one sentence that was shut down after 4 translators, 2 of them the duobot, which is ludicrous. I also found that once you had entered your sentence, if you didn't rate other sentences right away, you couldn't go back and do it later. Not too thrilled so far :(

4
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dexedge
dexedge
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I haven't run into this yet. How are you able to tell what percentage a previous translator received? The percent ratings are obviously a very imperfect measure. For example, I've received 100% ratings for translations that were not, in fact, perfect matches with the only other translation that had been contributed up to that point. And Duolingo seems to have the idea that there is such a thing as a "perfect" translation (a term the site actually uses), or one that can be 100% correct. Anyone who does any serious translation knows that this isn't any such thing as a "perfect" translation.

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GoodandPlenty

dexedge is right that there is usually no 'perfect' translation. Context, mood . . . many factors come into play. I don't care for the use of the word 'perfect'. Literal translations are usually horrible translations. Many people have a preferred translation for books - they prefer the style and sensibility of one translator over another. I have given several different translations 'perfect' ratings because each was quite good in its own way, nevermind that they were each a bit different. Mostly I select documents from the 'new translations' page, so mostly I am one of the first to work a document and have to give all negative ratings. I haven't seen or used this new system. I'll get to doing an article shortly probably.

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bjorseth

I find the "racing" element a turn-off. And if the computer--or whatever determines the 100%--is doing the ultimate translation, what's my place in the process?

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dexedge
dexedge
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I'm writing with incomplete knowledge, since I haven't worked with the new translation page yet. However, in the meantime, I have seen a screenshot posted on the Duolingo subreddit. It's not clear to me what that percentage rating actually means or measures. Is it some kind of internal rating for the Duolingo system, to say that "yes, enough people have translated this now, and the system has settled on a the 'correct' translation"? I'm not sure that this percentage number makes a whole lot of sense from a user's perspective. And I've certainly seen cases where quite a lot of people have translated something, and yet all missed something crucial (this happens especially, I think, in cases where a large proportion of the translators have been non-native speakers of English). So it's not clear to me that closing off further translation past some arbitrary point is necessarily always a good idea.

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmcliste
jmcliste
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That said, what I find interesting about this approach is that you can actually get a sense at how effective the duolingo model for translation is...and evidently democratic consensus is not necessarily an effective way to reach the best solution to a problem all the time. Generally the translation that wins out is not too bad, but there are some poor ones making it through to the final cut (including an embarrassing one of mine with a spelling error that I supposedly edited away multiple times but still miraculously kept resurfacing ... mais comme on dit, dommage!). What I don't like is that it seems to hamper interaction among users...you can only see, rate or comment on translations that come before yours, not after yours .. it is nice to see how a translation evolves, not just it's end product which you can no longer comment on.

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dexedge
dexedge
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Like GoodandPlenty, I often given the top rating to more than one translation--and this is the problem with the notion of a "perfect" translation, because it is often the case that there are several potential translations that are fully correct and idiomatic, so that it becomes a matter of taste in choosing among them. I also agree with jmcliste about the potential problems in the democratic consensus model of translating.

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dexedge
dexedge
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I seem not to have this yet. I've gathered that Duolingo sometimes introduces changes to just a limited subset of users.

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmcliste
jmcliste
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I think the original question is misinterpreting what the 100% means. It looks as though Duolingo has moved on to the process of actually reaching some sort of end point of actually producing a finished product and as each sentence gets more and more translations, the % rises until it reaches 100% and the sentence is closed for discussion. This seems to be different from the % agreement ratings that duolingo gives as feedback after submitting a translation, so it is false to characterize this system as shutting down each sentence as soon as somebody types in a literal translation. It doesn't do that. It is clear, however, that some sentences seem to be rigged to reach 100% after fewer translations than others.

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kelvinma13

Yeah, I dislike the percentage thing too. It does add an element of "racing" against other users though, maybe that's the point.

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bjorseth

A new translation format today. It shows the 100% translation. It also tells you if you have the highest percentage, and by how much.

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kelvinma13

No, I'm talking about the %complete data there. I don't see what other people got on their translations either.

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pjreads

Two new Science articles added 3 and 5 hours ago are already completely translated.

::sigh::

0
Reply5 years ago