"He made the agreement with the doctor."

Translation:Han lavede aftalen med doktoren.

October 8, 2014

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mato6666663

When do we use ''at gøre'' and ''at lave''?

May 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pat211087

I would like to know this too, as apparantly I used the wrong one.

May 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eb00kie

What is the difference between "lægen" and "doktoren"?

October 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb
Mod

    From what I can tell, other than the words' usage, is that "doktor" is the title, "læger" is the job. For example: Jeg hedder Doktor Jensen (I'm Doctor Jensen) but Mads er læger (Mads is a doctor). That's what I understand of it at least, if a native can correct me

    October 8, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duolingonaut

    I think you are right. I would say "Jeg skal til lægen" or if I was feeling silly "Jeg skal til doktormanden". I do not use the word "doktor" much. Presenting yourself as "Doktor X" is not common any more. I am pretty sure you would never hear anybody say "Jeg hedder Doktor X". Not even "Jeg er Doktor X". If you meet a doctor at a hospital he/she would present themselves by first saying their name and then telling you their job. "Jeg hedder Mads Jensen, jeg er overlæge her på psykiatrisk afdeling." It can be hard to distinguish between "læger" (doctors) and "lærer" (teacher). En læge, flere læger, alle lægerne. En lærer, flere lærere, alle lærerne.

    October 8, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kefir87

    Doesn't "doktor" mean "Ph.D" as well?

    February 3, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duolingonaut

    Yes: https://da.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doktorgrad

    Actually it seems that in Denmark the title "doctor" is above a "Ph. D". Obviously I'm not one.

    February 3, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kefir87

    "Doktorgrad" sounds like some city in Russia.

    February 3, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duolingonaut

    Yes so in Russian city names "grad" is a shortened version of "gorod" which means city. In Danish "grad" is more like the English "degree" or "grade". But you're right. Good one.

    February 3, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eb00kie

    What is the difference between "lægen" and "doktoren"?

    October 8, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sirpa879157

    I do not understand this sentence. You can make an agreement with someone, even with a doctor. But why THE agreement and THE doctor. A particular agreement with a particular doctor, yes. But I think as a sentence it is silly or meaningless. At least if it stands alone like this.

    December 4, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter68738

    If it is THE agreement, it obviously is about life and death. Makes sense to me.

    July 3, 2019
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