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  5. "Caitheann na páistí pitseáma…

"Caitheann na páistí pitseámaí."

Translation:The children wear pyjamas.

October 8, 2014

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sovay

Throwing it out there for any non-native English speakers who might be interested: "pyjamas," as far as I know, is a British spelling of the word. In the US, it's more commonly seen as "pajamas" or just spoken as "PJs."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ricky528429

I tried it, it'll accept it either way


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elijah55784

No it won't, i tried too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheManlyWaffle15

It should work, you might have just gotten something else in the question wrong. (Sorry if this was posted a long time ago, I am on mobile app and cannot see post dates.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Buttercup573687

I tried it too it does work ☺


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sylvain2015

This has been heavily discussed in other areas too. It seems that only the US uses pajamas whereas Canada, England, Ireland, and all other native English-speaking countries use pyjamas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YannickOfSwabia

Not entirely true. Here in western canada we use Pajamas (or PJs). Duolingo accepts both pyjamas and pajamas. Haven't teied PJs yet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berkhead

Correct in the US its pajamas


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Onyx.Rose

And here I am thinking I spelled it wrong somehow.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chalazon

Thank you. Upon further listening I picked up on the slender "s" sound. I'm a yank... going into my seventh decade and my hearing isn't what it used to be. Plus I live in the West and we don't generally hear this type of pronunciation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jon235428

Youre hearing it as an english "j" sound because in English that sound is whats called an "affricate", a sound treated as one consonant made from two being pronounced at the same time. Our "j" sound comes from "d" and a "zh" sound (like in "azure") being said at the same time. The cousin to this is the "ch" sound, which is really a "t" and "sh" at the same time. In this Irish word, you can see there's a "t" followed by a "sh" sound, so its more like an English "ch" but thats fairly close to "j"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chalazon

Why does the s get a j sound?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ricky528429

It doesn't. It gets an 'sh' sound. Anytime you see a consonant near an i or e, it gets whats called a slender sound. In the case of s, it make 'sh' where as being near any other vowel, it would have a broad sound and it just sounds like an s.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/helen775602

This is twice now i have used what i feel is present continuous tense in english "are wearing" and another similar situation where i don't think there's enough distinction in English to be wrong. Trying to figure out if the anomaly is in Irish or English...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1485

There is no anomaly. The present continuous isn't the present habitual, in English or in Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ricky528429

I've been looking through all my resources and I can't seem to find the genitve for pitseámaí. Anybody happen to know it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dimbulb

The kids are wearing pajamas not accepted; reported 17/VI/20.

Unless we're talking habitual action?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ricky528429

Thats because the kids are wearing pajamas would be "tá na páistí ag caitheamh pitseámaí" habitual action is exactly what we're talking. Just like English, Irish makes a distinction between the two

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