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  5. "They eat the cake."

"They eat the cake."

Translation:Itheann siad an cáca.

October 10, 2014

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MsJozie

The fada in cáca is very important..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

It reflects pronunciation. It would be the difference between "cake" and "poop".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hpfan5

in irish or English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

cáca is Irish for cake.

caca is Irish for "poop"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miss_Linguistic

''Caca'' is also Spanish for ''Poop'', hahah.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epac-mcl

In Maltese too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pgcasp

This ciste tastes like caca


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ethan_Osborne

Hahaha its poop cake


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaaniJ

Doesn't císte mean cake too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Yes císte can be cake as well. If you put it in and they marked you wrong, please report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaaniJ

Okay, thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gallifrey900

Why can't the translation be, "Ithimid an cáca?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kenan820

Itheann muid = Ithimid (contraction) = "We eat"

Itheann siad (no contraction) = "They eat"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VictoriaDo676547

Because that would mean "we eat the cake"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferHa511790

Why is "cáca" not aspirated?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Because it's a masculine noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the13thfirefly

Why do I keep wanting to put Itheann an cáca siad?

I think I'm getting a little confuzzled with syntax now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

For most verbs, it's Verb Subject Object/Complement. For the defective copula, it's Verb Complement Subject.
https://www.duolingo.com/skill/ga/Basics-1


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ahdithya28

What does siad mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

mé = I/me
tú = you (s)
sé/é = he/him/it
sí/í = she/her/it
muid/sinn = we/us
sibh = you (pl)
siad/iad = they/them


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vainnemoinen

i call foul! i translated it "itheann an caca siad"[sorry, don't know how to make the fada on the keyboard,] and it spat back "ithid an caca milis". no explanation of "milis", and excepting word order, the translation above is the same as mine. why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sinead820646

Cáca milis is a dilect thing commonly used here in the province of Munster, SW Kerry at least


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epac-mcl

I don't know if it's still spoken, but scone bread used to be called "cake" (cáca). That would mean one would have to differenciate between bread and cake, so "milis" (meaning sweet) would have been added to cake, hence "sweet cake" (cáca milis). In Danish, "melis" is a type of sugar, and the origin is probably from medieval latin "saccharum melitense" (sugar from Malta).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EUXcGQYJ

I translated "They eat the cake" as "itheann siad an cáca" and got it wrong. It was corrected as "ithid an cáca." Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassafras77

what does "milis" here mean


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2299

"Milis" means "sweet", but I don't see it anywhere here.

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