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  5. "Om het huis ligt een grote t…

"Om het huis ligt een grote tuin."

Translation:There is a big yard around the house.

October 10, 2014

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malcolmissimo

In British English, if a house has a yard it is a (usually small) area with a hard surface. To us, the Dutch 'tuin' translates to 'garden'. Indeed, online dictionaries tend to give 'garden' and not mention 'yard'. The "Open Tuinen Dagen" event website translates only to "Open Garden Days".

Nice to see that Duolingo accepts this, but a pity it isn't the main option. The rest of the world doesn't understand American yards.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

American feet and miles are hard to understand too!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Filjan

I was penalised for putting round instead of around. They are variations of the same thing in my book.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susande

Probably a UK English versus US English difference, see here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

@Filjan: If you report it, I'm sure it will be taken in Duo's books as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/justbronagh

Could you say een grote tuin ligt om het huis? If so what is the difference/most commonly used?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ishkhanuhi

My girlfriend (a native Dutch speaker) says both iterations are correct and the one you suggested ("Een grote tuin ligt om het huis") is more commonly used. Great question. :) Hope this helps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DSDragon

Why not "The house has a large yard?" Same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/El2theK

It is not the same thing. In your sentence there is a large yard with the house, can be in front of the house, behind the house, next to the house, around the house. It is not specified.

  • Om het huis - around the house, specifies that the yard is located around the house, and not for example only in front of it.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DSDragon

I said "lawn" instead of yard, which is the same thing. Why was it marked wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/El2theK

Definition of "lawn": an area of short, mown grass in a yard, garden, or park. In other words, a lawn is part of a yard/garden.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frank664005

A lawn is composed of grass.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZoeWa1ker

what the heckin does "round the garden" mean


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

As an adverb round is a common contraction of around. As an adjective, round means circular or spherical. "Round the garden" = "surrounding the garden". Although, in this case, it is the garden (or "yard" in the USA) that is surrounding the house.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Artur291996

So »tuin« is exclusively »yard«?

What about »garden«?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frank664005

Do Americans not have gardens ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jenn413276

Garden is a better translation of tuin than yard - yard is more of a hard surface whereas tuin refers more to somewhere you'd find grass, plants etc, ie kruidtuin for botanical garden

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