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"Goodbye, excuse me."

Translation:Adiós, disculpe.

2
5 years ago

101 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/alyssapelletier

Why would someone say Adiós, disculpe? Is that a common spoken phrase?

57
14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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I am also not sure if it's completely idiomatic, but here is two situations when it could arise:

"Goodbye. Excuse me [from keeping you company]."

"Goodbye. Excuse me [for having bothered you]."

39
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/agourgel

we don't use it in Portuguese if you said "disculpe, Adiós" it would make more sense

21
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duvet_154

I use similar expressions sometimes, such as "Hasta luego. Perdon/disculpe" (at least where I live, it's way more common to say "hasta luego" instead of "adios").

I use them when, say, I've gone to a place to consult about something ("bye, sorry (for bothering you)") or when I'm talking to someone and I have to leave suddenly ("bye, sorry (but I have to go)").

Although it's more common to apologize/excuse oneself BEFORE saying goodbye ("Disculpe. Hasta luego" / "Perdón. Hasta luego")

14
43 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/uyen.tnm99

Woud you mind point out for me the difference between 'perdón' and disculpe'? Because the translation just goes "excuse me" for both words.

Gracias!.

11
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/greenmachine19

That is why I looked at the discussions. Hoping someone knew. I feel like it could make sense if you suddenly had to leave a conversation or meeting, but I have never heard of it before.

10
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HeinrichIV
HeinrichIV
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Yes. Disculpe makes it clear that you are sorry and also requests permission to leave or room to walk out. I missed the alternate translation "Disculpeme".

5
23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/18zelinskj

same

-2
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Could I say "Adiós, lo siento"?

5
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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"Lo siento" is when you've done something wrong.

More good advice found HERE.

4
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Whitetiger159

I'm confused

-1
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarissaR2005

I think so

0
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrooklynOrtiz13

idk its hard to understand cuz I put Adios, yo disculpe

0
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erpelmama

Yo disculpe is not correct. It would be yo disculpo then, but that would mean that you excuse someone else.

6
13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spiritdragoninja

yo means I.

-2
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/w-v22

hi

-1
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thepayne06

Brand

0
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChyanneDal

0
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Harmonycute

Well i dony think so

0
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmb98088

When would I use perdon instead of disculpe?

22
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SophiXRU

Perdon is more casual it is used when you have some familiarity with the person you are talking to (tu=you) and disculpe is way more formal it is used when you use usted (usted= you formal)

8
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristinaMekvold
ChristinaMekvold
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When someone is mixing spanish and french and it takes that as a typo… oops. Though, in all seriousness, perdon really is just the same as pardon. In that given situation, it is merely an inflection on having disrupted the other's time, and asking for pardon.

5
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/testdowns

I thought that you could also say "con permiso" for excuse me.

14
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chesnekd

Con permiso is used to ask to do something. It does mean excuse me, but the meaning is different in Spanish. Sadly, I thought the sentence was asking to do something, instead of apologizing. I think it needs context added or fixed.

10
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eyebleave

why cant I use disculpame (with accent on the u?)

6
5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MiguelB5

"Excuse me" is meant as an apology for example when bumping into a stranger, in Spanish this is translated as "disculpe" (formal, for a stranger) or "disculpa" (informal, for a friend). "Discúlpame" sounds more like "forgive me" ('big' apology) rather than "excuse me" ('small' apology). I don't know if I made myself clear, hope it helped!

85
125 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/melvinhc

That's what i thought

2
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JustKirill

when will we use disculpo ( as in first person)?

4
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleBurbac

To say that you excuse another.

3
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chelsynschulte

right, like "I excuse you"

0
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jovan.

Why not "Chao, discuple"?

3
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SophiXRU

Because chao isn't a spanish word

0
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kstarrlynn
kstarrlynn
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I thinks ome Spanish speakers say "ciao," pronounced similarly.

0
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HeinrichIV
HeinrichIV
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Here there are problems stemming from the fact that Spanish is used with different vocabularies and different turns of phrases over the Spanish speaking world. In many places one would seldom say "Adiós" because of its almost formal and final connotation. In those places people would say "Hasta luego". There is a big difference between everyday Spanish in Mexico and in Southern South America

3
13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SophiXRU

Yes, in mexico we say adios or hasta luego, or sometimes both, but hasta luego means see you again

2
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nosoyyoorme

Yes, that is one problem, along with the fact that the system wants literal translations, and not what is actually commonly used.

0
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RebeccaChana

I would assume that excuse me would be descuplame, which is a command for one to excuse me hence descupla (you excuse) me (me). At least that's how I learned it in class. Did I just go a little too advanced for this level or did I miss the point?

2
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yarshad

Hmm, I was trying to ask whether the subjunctive form 'disculpe' is used more commonly than the 3rd person formal command 'disculpa' haha

1
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HomesickTourist

Why perdoname is ok but excusame is incorrect

1
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erpelmama

Because the verb excusar means something different than perdonar.

0
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anamariapalos

discúlpeme o discúlpame es perfectamente correcto

1
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ruthannshort

why doesn't "chau, disculpe" work?

1
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MiguelB5

As far as I know "chau" is not a word in Spanish; perhaps you refer to the Italian word "ciao". Although some speakers might use it, it is not a Spanish word. It is more commonly used to sound "international", not really valid.

5
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nosoyyoorme

I hear chao every day numerous times a day in Latin America (Ecuador and Colombia), from people of all backgrounds and ages. Everyone uses it for a casual good-bye ("bye" rather than "good-bye," which is why I didn't put "chao" here). I rarely hear adios, which, like I said elsewhere, is generally used for a long-term or final good-bye

2
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconut_water

30

1
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yarshad

Is 'disculpa' more commonly used than 'disculpe'?

1
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erpelmama

Disculpe is more formal than disculpa because disculpe is subjuntivo y disculpa is imperative.

1
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nosoyyoorme

No, disculpa is imperative for tú, and disculpe is imperative for ústed.

0
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Franchesca33938

Why would say "adios" ? And not "ciao"

1
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anamariapalos

Ciao is italian, adiós is spanish

3
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoRunyan

I wrote, Adios, disculpeme. Is that not also correct?

1
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erpelmama

"Disculpe" es subjuntivo, you could for example say "Le ruego me disculpe" because rogar demands the subjuntivo, but to put the "me" at the end you need to have an imperative, and that's disculpa.

1
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2confident

Can you say disculpe adios

1
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mylittleangels

could someone please tell me why it is incorrect to say "adios, disculpeme

1
14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erpelmama

"Disculpe" es subjuntivo, you could for example say "Le ruego me disculpe" because rogar demands the subjuntivo, but to put the "me" at the end you need to have an imperative, and that's disculpa.

0
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nazeer7
nazeer7
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is the ( disculpa - perdon ) have the same maening?

1
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/qazbase

'Disculpe' is kind of a difficult word to type.

1
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SophiXRU

Me too

1
3 years ago