"Ele come um biscoito."

Translation:He eats a cookie.

June 15, 2013

43 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
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I speak European Portuguese, and I call a cookie "bolacha." It's just another way of saying the word. :)

December 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ruama_semtempo
Mod
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In São Paulo-BR, people say "bolacha" too.

April 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/everton.flavio
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No sul do Brasil também comemos "bolacha". Nobody here says "biscoito".

April 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ruama_semtempo
Mod
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Muito bom saber, porque todo mundo diz que se fala bolacha só em SP e que o resto do mundo fala uma variação de biscoito. Mas aqui temos dois ótimos exemplos de que não é bem assim.

April 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
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Muito obrigado, everton.flavio, pela tua contribuição! :)

April 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
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Really? Não sabia. Que fixe/legal/bacano! ;D

April 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Dieg022

Uma hora você responde "cookie" e a resposta é "cookies" , outra hora você responde "cookies" e a resposta é "cookie".

March 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/teistephen

meaning?

June 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
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Once, you answer "cookie," and the answer is "cookies; another time, you answer "cookies," and the answer is "cookie."

December 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/RiffelRaquel

eu escrevo biscuit e também sinaliza como correto.

September 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
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Sim.

cookie = americano
biscuit = britânico

September 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RiffelRaquel

got it, thank you.

September 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DrDarthBatHulk

This souned like DIS-coito to me, even with the headphones....

December 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/kitsune1977
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A pronúncia do duolingo é realmente horrível...o certo é "biscoito".

July 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/BRad20

I put biscuit and it said it was correct but cookie was correct also. Is it a biscuit or a cookie? Or is there a different word for biscuit.

May 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
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The British use "biscuit" to mean "cookie" in American. An American biscuit is something else entirely.

September 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/xxBetzalelxx

Different parts of Brazil haven't had "cookies" till recently, so biscuit is more common.

December 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/JandraErla

Bolacha= cookie

May 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert-Johnson

Hm, I was just docked for "biscuit"

January 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
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You shouldn't be. Report it.

January 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Aislan-Neves

biscuit e cookie tem diferença?

January 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
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São dois nomes diferentes para a mesma coisa. "Biscuit" is used in the United Kingdom, while "cookie" is used in the United States. Ambos significam «bolacha» mas cuidado! Nos Estados Unidos da América, a palavra "biscuit" tem outro significado, um tipo de pão bem fofo e amanteigado: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biscuit_(bread).

January 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Aislan-Neves

Thank you! Biscuit sounds strange :/

January 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
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I suppose it does sound a bit strange if you're used to calling «uma bolacha» "a cookie," like I am. :D

January 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/AnneChernett

Aislan-Neves - and cookie sounds weird to me :-) because I'm English. I've just worked out what an American biscuit is. It's an English scone. What shall we put on it? English jam or American jelly? What's Portuguese for jam/jelly? I bet it's something like marmalada........

February 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
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American biscuits might look like a scone, but they are not as dry and are certainly not eaten with tea as a dessert. They are flaky and buttery and are eaten with one's meal. They tend to go well with a side of mashed potatoes. :) What is the difference between English jam and American jelly? I know that there is both jam and jelly here in the USA.

As for how you say jam/jelly in Portuguese, there is a plethora of ways. You could say «geléia» which would be a cognate. You could also say «compota». Another much more common way to say it nowadays is «doce», as in «doce de abacaxi e coco». The word would normally mean "sweet," but this meaning is understood in context. Finally, although I suppose «marmelada» could mean any type of "jam"/"marmalade" too, it is much more commonly used to refer to the "marmelada" made from "marmelos" ("quinces," so "quince jam"). This is absolutely heavenly!! Just spread it inside a "papo seco" (Portuguese roll), and, as we say here in the States, you're good to go! :P

Refer to this: http://www.wordreference.com/pten/geleia

February 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/AnneChernett

Wow! That's interesting. My granny used to make lovely light buttery scones but the only traditional savoury ones are cheese scones. We sometimes top a stew with plain savoury scones but then call it a cobbler which is Australian. In England a cream tea is a pot of tea with scones, clotted cream and strawberry jam. Delicious. My granny also made jam. Bramble jam had the whole blackberry fruits in it. Bramble jelly was made from the juice. No bits. There is also jelly made from gelatine which is served as a sweet/desert/pudding with custard, ice cream or cream. Must get back to learning Portuguese. I can't wait to try papo seco.

February 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
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Wow, that all sounds very delicious. I just realized though that I've never tried scones made in the UK. I've only ever tried scones made in a popular supermarket here in the US, so all I know is the dry scones they make. I had no idea that scones could be light and buttery. I would love to try that bramble jelly and that dessert pudding jelly with custard!

February 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ottomatic98

I said it was a biscotti, but I guess they don't have those...?

March 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
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Biscotti is the Italian plural for biscotto, which is cognate to the Portuguese biscoito.

March 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
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I believe they do have biscotti in Brazil. In both languages, «biscotto» and «biscoito» mean "cookie." (As a speaker of European Portuguese, though, I normally call cookies «as bolachas».) In fact, if you break the morphemes in the Italian word, it literally means "twice-cooked."

March 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MP0xlP

What I think of when I hear «biscoito» (with an Azores EP background) are specifically these kind of cookies (link in English), they're slightly sweet with a light flavor thanks to the lemon and very hard: http://portuguesediner.com/tiamaria/biscoitos-portuguese-bisquits/

February 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Hamnetz

I put he ate a cookie is that wrong because he's eating it now?

April 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Davu
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Because this sentence uses the present tense in Portuguese ("come") the best answer is "eats" rather than the past tense "ate". There is a way to say that he is eating it right now: "Ele está comendo um biscoito".

April 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/hendrie

if you say that "he eat a cookie" is wrong, are you testing my English grammar knowledge or my knowledge of Portuguese?

June 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/FrederickEason
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Both.

June 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/RomaRRio

"eats" is right

July 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/hendrie

I know, but I wonder whether 'eat' instead of 'eats' should not be considered to be a typo, like some other small mistakes. And, 'eat' instead of 'eats' is an English grammar mistake, which doesn't really change the meaning :-)

July 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
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It definitely changes the meaning because then "he" is not the subject of the sentence anymore.

December 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
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Yes. Because English is not a pro-drop language, because it has relatively few verb conjugations, conjugating the verb wrong is nothing more than an agreement error, but beyond that the meaning does not change.

I do get what you're saying, but that's Romance languages. :-)

December 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
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True.

December 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
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Saying "he eat" instead of "he eats" is definitely an agreement error, but it does not change the subject of the sentence.

December 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
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Why would it not? ...Oh, I see what you mean. Well, that's because English requires "He," you can't drop that. But if you could, it would change the subject to either I, you, we, you, or they.

December 14, 2014
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