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  5. "Goideann sé airgead ón mbanc…

"Goideann airgead ón mbanc."

Translation:He steals money from the bank.

October 11, 2014

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alphalyrae

For goodness' sake Pól, can't you manage to stay out of trouble for just one module?

June 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Desiree29977

That must be why he needed a lawyer?

June 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jackmchugh12

difference between 'ón' and 'as an' ?

October 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

as is more like "out of".

October 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaramataBG

Is goideann related to the name Goidelic for Irish, Scottish Gaelic, and Manx?

May 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fabitorti

ón bhanc : is it possible here? .

September 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Yes — it would be good Ulster Irish.

November 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Searlasmane

Ó, Pól, tá díomá orm

May 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ballygawley

difference betwen rob and steal?

June 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

“Rob” usually means that force or violence was involved in the theft; for example, shoplifting is an example of stealing, and mugging is an example of robbery.

November 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charlieosh1

He steals or robs is it not the same thing?

October 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1227

In English, you "rob a bank" or you "steal money from a bank". To "steal a bank" would imply that you carried the bank away with you (a piggy bank, perhaps), or perhaps cheated the rightful owners out of it.

While "robbed" is sometimes used to differentiate between "stolen" and "stolen with force", even there, the point is that "rob" and "steal" aren't interchangable.

The Irish for"rob" is "robáil".
http://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/rob%C3%A1il

October 14, 2017
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