"Déanfaimid an scrúdú ar scoil amárach."

Translation:We will do the test at school tomorrow.

4 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jamckillip48

Two teachers talking about making up a test?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kebukebu
kebukebu
  • 20
  • 20
  • 18
  • 18
  • 17
  • 17
  • 16
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 4
  • 1357

I'm confused too. I put "take the test" and was marked wrong, so... Clarification needed.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flyingdics
flyingdics
  • 17
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10

Is there any reason that "take the test" is not accepted? I can't see any way to understand this sentence this that would preclude "take the test."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RWWTaylor

To add to the confusion here, the hover notes suggest that "make the test" would be an acceptable translation here (instead of "do the test"). In order to proceed with the lesson I tried entering this, and found it accepted. Hmm...

In my four decades or so in the educational environment I gave many a test to my students, every one of the tests made be me. And the students would take the tests. Many a time I had to field the question "Will we have a test tomorrow?". In all that time the only tests that were ever done (to my knowledge) were those in the chem lab.

It would seem that there is enough confusion of idiom and usage to make this particular item a hindrance rather than a help in this lesson, and that this lesson might be improved by its deletion or replacement. Just a suggestion...

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

Did any of your students "do" the SATs?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
  • 24
  • 15
  • 453

Would "Tabharfaimid faoin scrúdú ar scoil amárach" be acceptable?

Déanfaimid an scrúdú sounds a bit like Béarlachas to me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JSNuttall
JSNuttall
  • 21
  • 20
  • 17
  • 16
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 2
  • 769

Except that's not how you'd say it in English (at least, not in the dialect I speak; I can't promise this is true everywhere). I'd never say "we will do the test" -- I'd say "we will take the test". So to me, this seemed like more or less the opposite of an Anglicism -- it seemed like a phrase that Duolingo was translating too literally into English so that the English translation didn't make sense.

(Again, though, that's in my dialect (I live in Los Angeles) -- do people say "do the test" in the U.K.?)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

Do an internet search for "do the test" and "take the test" and you'll find that "take the test" is only slightly more common than "do the test".

I've no idea what the say in the UK, but according to the reverse translation, they say "do the test" in Ireland.

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/11445790

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JSNuttall
JSNuttall
  • 21
  • 20
  • 17
  • 16
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 2
  • 769

Hm... the raw comparison of Google search result counts could be misleading, because some of the results for "do the test" include those words as part of a larger phrase like "What do the test results mean?", a few of them use "do the test" to mean "administer the test", and for some reason many of the results Google returns for "do the test" don't actually include the phrase "do the test" at all, but do include "take the test", so I'm not sure what's going on there... maybe despite the quotation marks Google is still returning related results that don't match the exact phrase. So the difference may not be as slight as it superficially seems.

Still, regardless of the relative counts, there are many pages returned that do use the phrase "do the test" with the meaning under discussion here, so apparently yes, that phrase is used in some areas... it's just not in common use where I live. (And judging by the comments on this page from jamckillip48 and kebukebu, I'm apparently not alone in this.)

Heh... you know, I guess in addition to learning foreign languages, Duolingo is also helping me learn more about regional differences in English...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
  • 25
  • 1532

I think that tabhair faoin scrúdú is closer to “begin the test” than “take the test”. The NEID has rinne mé scrúdú for “I took an exam”, and the FGB offers scrúdú a dhéanamh for “to do an examination”, so if déan an scrúdú is an anglicism, it’s been around since at least the mid-1970s.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
  • 24
  • 15
  • 453

Rinne mé scrúdú sounds natural for the past as the exam is over. But déan applied to the future seems less Gaelic to me than tabhair faoi. See meaning number 2 for tabhair faoi

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
  • 25
  • 1532

Tabharfaimid faoin scrúdú is certainly possible. The EID has dul faoi scrúdú and scrúdú a sheasamh for “To take an examination” and “To do an examination”, so perhaps Rachaimid faoin scrúdú and Seasfaimid an scrúdú would be the traditional choices.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
  • 23
  • 23
  • 20
  • 17
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 45

I guessed déanaimid and got it wrong. English (and German) quite often uses the present-in-the-future, so it seemed reasonable. Given that the f is not heard in Irish, I get that I got it wrong. But - does Irish use present tense as an option in this context??

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
  • 24
  • 15
  • 453

The presence of ámarach lets us know that it is the future that is involved, hence déanfaimid. A grammar book which I have says:

Baintear feidhm as an Aimsir Fháistineach nuair a dhéantar tagairt don am atá le teacht. (The future tense is used when reference is made to a future time).

So the present-in-the-future should not be used in Irish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DerryOFarr

I always thought that scrudu was either a test or exam?!?.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StellaMari334520

I would say 'do the test' myself but would understand 'take the test' as well

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMurray29
JasonMurray29
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 4
  • 239

I get how some people are confused by this sentence being 'do' as opposed to 'take', but in Irish class the teacher often enough uses the phrase 'scrudu a dheanadh' (spelling obviously horrible

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyHaich
AyHaich
  • 25
  • 25
  • 8
  • 6
  • 3
  • 2

I think the audio should pronounce the "f" in "déanfaimid" more clearly so you can differentiate between "déanfaimid" and "déanaimid"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

However, it's not really ever pronounced in native speech.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hopswatch
Hopswatch
  • 20
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3
  • 2

Sneaky.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deserttitan

Then how on earth does one tell the difference?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
  • 24
  • 15
  • 453

"ámarach" is in the future so you know it's the future tense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OlegRussia

But if the sentence was just "Déanfaimid an scrúdú", how would we guessed present or future tence was used there?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
  • 24
  • 15
  • 453

If it were a written question then the presence of 'f' in déanfaimid indicates the future tense and its absence indicates the present tense.

If it were an aural question then it would be ambiguous as the 'f' is not sounded and it would require some other information to make it a fair question. e.g.

  • Déanaimid an scrúdú inniu (present tense)
  • Déanfaimid an scrúdú amárach (future tense)
9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
  • 25
  • 1532

In some dialects, the f in déanfaimid would be pronounced like an h.

1 month ago
Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.