"Er ist gegangen."

Translation:He has gone.

October 12, 2014

21 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RafaRiff

I just love to say gegangen. Ich bin gegangen. Sie ist mit mir gegangen. Er ist nach Hause gegangen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/b48ad5f2

You should also learn this word: "entgegengegangen"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RafaRiff

Oh, this rises to another level of pleasure!!! What does "entgegengegangen" mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/b48ad5f2

Literally means "(to have) gone towards"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanyDin

he went is right too ya?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod

    Yes, in meaning, but that's a different tense. The introduction page to this lesson (view on a web browser) explains the difference between Präteritum and Perfekt tenses.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gboychevg

    Why is "He walked" wrong?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/baptizatusAudax

    I was expecting this to mean "he has walked".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ap2907

    I absolutely agree and have reported that.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SecretlyAHippo

    Could this also be used as "He is gone"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    No.

    "He is gone. (= not here any more)" would be Er ist weg.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helenepjusken

    Why not "Er gegangen"? Something to do with movement or...?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dhMuse

    The perfect always requires an auxiliary verb. Usually this verb is haben, but in cases like this (yes, gehen being a movement verb), it is sein. Even if the main verb wasn't a movement/change-of-condition verb, still the example you gave would not be grammatically correct, because it lacks the auxiliary verb.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Kierz_

    gehen = gegangen???


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ConanDoyle11

    I thought the verb gehen always meant to walk, rather than the broader use of "go" in English, but it was marked wrong when I translated this as "he has walked." Do the semantics change with the aspect?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahTwloha

    Does anyone know how to distinguish between "he is gone" and "he has gone"? "He is gone" sort of implies that he left someplace/someone suddenly and will not be back for a while, if ever (or that he died). Whereas "he has gone" just means that he left the place where he was?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahTwloha

    Oh, nevermind, I think I figured it out. "Er ist weg" could mean he is away or he is gone (in the sense that I was thinking of). Correct me if I'm wrong, danke!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PetrLakevi

    Could "Er ist gegangen" mean "He left"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Could "Er ist gegangen" mean "He left"?

    Yes.

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