https://www.duolingo.com/Kaninchenfreund

How do you practice your German outside Duolingo ?

Hallo,just wanted to know you guys practice your knowlege everyday outside Duolingo and see if I can benifit from your ways to practice.Me,I visit German site in their original language,trying to understand what's written,if I can't,I get back here to complete some more skills.How about you ? Vielen Dank.

3 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/alexinIreland
alexinIreland
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I use this site a lot: http://www.nachrichtenleicht.de. It is really easy to use and understand :) I also watch a lot of movies and TV in German. For example, I use the ZDF app daily :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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Thanks for the tip!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siebenundzwanzig

I speak to people. xD I guess you could say I practice by using sites in German, my phone in German, and whatever else in German.

GL!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JDuarte1

It would be nice to have a way to schedule Skype or Google Hangouts conversation with other students...

For reading German I've been using LingQ.com, which is great for acquiring vocabulary. You upload a text, mark the words you can already recognize, and then focus solely on the words you don't know yet. There's a paid plan where you can create flashcards and stuff, but I didn't go for that yet. I haven't been studying German for a few years, so I'm using Duolingo + LingQ for a quick recall: Duolingo for the most basic stuff, and LingQ to pursue more advanced goals. Besides, I'll soon get a grammar book or two.

I also like listening to German playlists on Spotify. If you don't have a membership there, you can still listen to the playlists in random mode, or find music elsewhere. The nice thing about it is that I can listen to them while running, on the bus or working.

German movies are great too, and I'm going to get Deutsche Welle on the cable TV soon.

Besides, my Cellphone, sites, Smart-TV and computers are all in German.

Memrise.com is also a very fun and motivating way of acquiring new vocabulary.

Another interesting website is Italki.com, where you can find other people who are learning the same language, or native speakers from your target language who need help with your native language - so that you can help each other to get some practice. I've never tried some live conversation there yet, but I'm going to do that soon.

I know it seems like a lot of effort, but the problem to me is that I've managed to learn German reasonably well in the past, but that knowledge slipped away since I don't get as much practice as I get in English.

So all these different strategies are just a way of getting in touch with the language more oftenly. Try some of them or all of them - whatever works for creating a "immersion" environment in your own life.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoesVanBos
LoesVanBos
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I practice vocabulary at Memrise through several word lists. If you want to practice Duolingo vocab with genders, it's good to start here: http://www.memrise.com/course/335725/comprehensive-german-duolingo-vocabulary/

DW has a really nice collection of courses/podcasts, with a pdf of the material and the things to look out for added to each audio lesson. They are also sorted by level. Here: http://www.dw.de/learn-german/s-2469

That's about it for the online for me. In the physical world, I carry a tiny notebook with three columns with me everywhere, and use one side of it to write down words I think of or stumble upon (left column german, right column my mother tongue, middle column some other foreign word I know if it matches the meaning more closely than the word in my mother tongue - I write in one column and fill in missing info at home), and the other side to write down forms of irregular verbs. Since most of the words end in the notebook when I figure I cannot think of them in regular conversation or understand them when I see them somewhere, this helps me in building a vocabulary that's tailored to what I'm interested in, much better than any pre-made course :)

I'm also taking classes in a language school, which helps to bind it all together and allows me to actually construct my own sentences, talk to other learners and the teacher, get corrected, get uncertainties cleared up.

Occasionally I get brave enough to try to speak to native speakers (other than the teacher, that is), but more often I chicken out :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iron_bun
iron_bunPlus
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Movies. I've labelled all of my DVDs that have German audio and I put one on whenever I'm in the mood.

Last night was the Matrix Reloaded. I was quite proud of myself for working out what she meant when Niobe said, "Eine Gedinge ändern." I realised because eine doesn't match up with ändern that I must have misheard and it should have been, "Einige Dinge ändern." Some things change.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A_AbdElhy

this site is very awesome http://www.pauljoycegerman.co.uk/abinitio/index.html try it. and there is also Rosetta stone it is a program i used it .

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rhythmixed
rhythmixed
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I don't really have much practice outside of Duolingo other than my class at school, which I'm grateful for. I don't live in a city with many German speakers, so it's difficult to find someone to practice with. My friend is taking German too, so we practice with each other if we see each other.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Omar_18

I practise German through chatting on Skype in a Group or with friends ( Of course chatting in German ) .. and i also read stories in German to improve it .

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/suzelsaunt

I found out that the German Amerikan Klub in my area offers a German class so I go to it once a week and have dinner with other classmates before class to practice. I am wanting to find more ways to practice though.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blinkage

I converse with the only other German speaker at my work when I get the chance. Neither of us is fluent but we stumble along. German is his fourth language and he has used it since the 80's when he left Europe (Polish immigrant) so he's rather rusty. He has a larger vocab but I'm better with grammar so it's a win/win.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aeribus
aeribus
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If I watch a movie that has German dialog in it, I won't look at the English subtitles unless I'm not able to figure out something that has been said. My Chrome homepage has been set to Google for quite a while, so naturally I set the language to German as well. I also have Deutsche Welle bookmarked and will occasionally go there to read current news in German. I started listening to Rammstein back in 1995-1996, and continue to do so to this day which of course helps. I also started teaching my 2 y/o son German which has helped a bit. He's even started asking me to play Rammstein's Amerika quite often.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kastreitor
Kastreitor
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Second Life, but be polite and obey the rules.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LarsHogberg
LarsHogberg
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I played Broken Sword 5 on my android phone. It's a great point-and-click adventure. This kind of games contains a lot of conversations so it's perfect for language training. In the options you can select both German audio and German sub-titles. The level of the language is fairly high, but with the help of the environment around the characters it's easy to understand what they are saying.

3 years ago
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