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"Comenzó a llover."

Translation:It started to rain.

5 years ago

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/galleon484
galleon484
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I'm disappointed that "you started to rain" was not accepted. Maybe i like talking to the earth about what it's up to.

Don't judge me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicoNSG

"you started to rain" would be "comenzaste a llover," not "comenzó a llover"

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LowlandPhilomath

Unless Galleon is a respectful lad, talking to Earth in a formal manner :)

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mystman1234

Why does the "a" need to be here?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

"Comenzar" and "empezar" need an "a" if they go right before another infinitive: empezar a correr, comenzaré a cenar, empezaba a hacer frío", etc.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anastasios912

So empezar could also work with "its starting to rain"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Yes:

It is starting to rain = Está empezando/comenzando a llover, both are fine :]

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anastasios912

Gracias! :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LowlandPhilomath

Related to this: For an extensive list of verbs doing this, see this link on 'linked verbs': http://users.ipfw.edu/jehle/courses/VRBSPREP.HTM

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gr8rubs

some verbs require "a" when combined with other verbs. Comenzar a, terminar a, ayudar a, ir a etc.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Artifiko
Artifiko
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The ground opened up, inviting the sky to wash away its dirt and grime. The world grew not dark, nor light. But damp, as each drip dropped down from the clouds onto the solid ground emitting air so fresh that with each breath it expelled every particle of waste from throughout your entire body. Every living soul rejoiced for the cool moisture bestowed upon us from the sky. And thus.. It began to rain.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tmci7865

Why was "He started to leak" not accepted? I'm a nurse and work with oldies... It happens all the time!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexandreM195

Why I need to put "it" on beggining? Unfair

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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The subject (it) of started is implicit in the Spanish verb isn't it? Did you put "started to rain" as your answer? It is incorrect English - we say: it rains, it snows, it starts to rain, it stoppeded snowing. We need this mysterious "it" in English!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inckwise

Maybe I am missing something, but I thought two "ll"s together, as in "llover" sounded like "y"...like in "llama". The audio sounds like it is pronouncing "llover" like "Jover".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gr8rubs

Many South Americans pronounce the "ll" like a j.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BaronGrim

Yeah, I often have a problem with the accent of the speaker. I'm assuming it's a Spanish regional accent. My ear is accustomed to a Mexican accent. It certainly sounded to me like she was saying "joo-ver".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stinkstonk

I heard "joo-vesh"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheQueenZerelda

It began to rain. T_T

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/da_rookie

Gracías Alí

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dleehii

This confused me. I was pretty sure llover was to rain, but I forgot that comenzó was he/she/it started. I thought it was "I started."

I'm still struggling with the past tense of verbs.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KathyMeador

"It is beginning to rain" does not work.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fresauno
fresauno
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I wrote "It is beginning to rain" and it was not accepted. Why is it incorrect?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gr8rubs

because "is beginning" is the present progressive, not the past. your sentence would be "está comenzando a llover".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/8stringfan

"It commenced to rain" wasn't accepted?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gr8rubs

It probably should be, except it sounds a little "hillbilly" to say it that way.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/8stringfan

Ha! I actually think it sounds the opposite - sort've overly formal. For example, "The driver had just pulled the carriage up to the castle when it commenced to rain."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gr8rubs

I hope you contacted Duolingo because "comenzar" and "commence" are obviously from the same Latin origin. It may take some time, but they've accepted several of my answers that originally they marked as wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jimlynch4
Jimlynch4Plus
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My experience also

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RD444

It's started to rain didn't work...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gr8rubs

no it wouldn't because "it's started" means "it has started" which is not the past (preterite) tense, but the present perfect. Comenzó is the preterite tense... so "began", "started", or "commenced" would be the right word.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarrenEsch
WarrenEsch
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I wrote 'It HAS started to rain' and was marked wrong. This way sounds more natural to me. Is the speaker maybe talking about past tense?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gr8rubs

Sí. Simple past, not past perfect.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarrenEsch
WarrenEsch
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Thank you for your reply. I am finding my weaknesses and working on improving them:)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rick717328

I also wrote "it has started to rain" and was marked wrong. I almost wrote "It's started to rain" which sounds natural, and would be the same.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DoYouSpeakBull
DoYouSpeakBull
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Wouldn't the gerund form "It started raining" be more appropriate here?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gr8rubs

Spanish uses the infinitive form for both, so it started to rain and it started raining would both be correct English translations. Whether Duolingo recognizes that fact is another matter.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/benjefford

me too

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/benjefford

me too i don't get why you shows up there

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RSvanKeure
RSvanKeure
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Audio sounds like "comenzo" instead of "comenzó". DL does not any longer provide a place to explain why there is an error in an item.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mildred220523

It starts to rain ?????shouldnt this be correct

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gr8rubs

Nope. Hint: aren't you working on past tense?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/violinda41
violinda41
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I translated, "It was beginning to rain." Doesn't this mean the same as "It started to rain."? If not, please tell me how you would say, "It was beginning to rain" in Spanish, if not "Comenzo a llover."

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gr8rubs

It's nuance of meaning. You could say "Estaba a punto a llover" which means "it was about to rain". Try to remember that you're dealing with the simple past tense. So "it began" is the past tense and "was beginning" isn't. That's another lesson.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertKinzie

This got me thinking about the English. The subject is the pronoun 'it' that stands in for what? "The weather"? "The day"? "The sky"?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gr8rubs

English often requires a subject, even if the subject has no meaning. "It" serves as a dummy pronoun and fulfills the job of a subject but has no content. As in: "It's warm in here."

5 months ago