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  5. "I come on the first day of J…

"I come on the first day of January."

Translation:Tagaim ar an gcéad lá d'Eanáir.

October 14, 2014

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khmanuel

So cead means first, but it also means a hundred?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ballygawley

Yes, scroll down in link, also for samples of use, e.g. aon ...

http://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/c%c3%a9ad


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/niallktin

Cead = 1st is not mentioned in the notes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skarpsill

What is the 'd' in front of Eanáir?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Because the preposition de is being used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

But should de be used here? Wouldn’t just the genitive of Eanáir (conveniently also Eanáir) be needed? Or is de + nominative an acceptable option?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

In FGB's example (under 'first') they use de. (An chéad lá d'Aibreán)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Entry number 18 here shows that either nominative use with de or genitive use without de is possible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MNMmcg

Why would you use the preposition "de/d'" here instead of the genitive of Éanair? Come to think of it, under what circumstances in general do you use the genitive over "de/d'"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1397

In this case, you are referring to part of the month, and this is the partitive de indicating part of the whole.

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