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"It is time to establish new rules."

Translation:Es hora de establecer nuevas reglas.

0
5 years ago

71 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/kcmurphy
kcmurphyPlus
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Is there a difference in meaning between "nuevas reglas" and "reglas nuevas"?

39
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PuntoH
PuntoH
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No, but the first one is the usual way to say it.

23
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

That seems odd to me, since the adjective typically goes after the noun in Spanish; I've the understanding that reversing the order can either create a new meaning or sound odd or poetic. So, I'm wondering why it would be usual for the adjective to go first for this expression.

21
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PuntoH
PuntoH
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Usually the adjective is placed after the noun, but there are exceptions. Take a look at the following link, which explains almost everything.

http://goo.gl/mG6S9q

33
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chisoxfan_13

That is interesting and thanks for the link, but when you look at the word new in the last list., it comes after the noun when it is used as "new" and before the noun when it is used as "another". I'm going to follow you rule, but it is confusing.

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/djangosChef

The "rules" aren't new as in just created our fresh out of the package, they're new as in replacement or alternative (which is kind of related to "another" from your reference).

6
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pawan_chand
pawan_chand
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Could you elucidate the meaning changing adjectives..."When placed after the noun like normal, the adjective carries a fairly objective, descriptive meaning. When placed before the noun, the adjective carries a more subjective, opinionated meaning."?

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/esphanihortusch

Can you define elucidate?

5
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kcmurphy
kcmurphyPlus
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Thanks!

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregHullender
GregHullender
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Nuevas reglas means "additional rules." Reglas nuevas means "new rules." Note that the English could mean either one; "We need to establish new rules (on top of the ones we already have or replacing the ones we already have).

17
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Homrul
Homrul
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If this is the case, why is "reglas nuevas" wrong? How do I know Duo isn't in fact meaning "new rules". That's what I thought and lost a heart.

8
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/djangosChef

This is an interesting subtlety. When the adjective is in its normal position after the noun, it has its normal, objective meaning. "Nueva" normally means "new" as in freshly minted, just made, just created, just taken out of the package, .... This is a meaning that doesn't apply very well to concepts, like rules. Maybe Einstein's theory of relativity was "new" in that sense when he came up with it. But I don't think that when we say "It's time for new rules" that we really intend to focus on whether the rules themselves represent concepts that have never ever been thought of before. What we intend to focus on with the word "new" is that we are replacing (or adding to) the old rules - we're changing the rules somehow. Our English constructions don't differentiate, and we conflate these two senses. It's nice that Spanish offers a way to differentiate them.

9
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shortsy

Is it ok to say, "Es la hora..."?

15
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aristotlefan

That's what I put, and it was marked wrong. No idea why. Anyone?

12
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/verylazyguy

I have the same question. I've heard it said this way a lot. Not sure why it's wrong

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AutumnAkin1
AutumnAkin1
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I put it but it wanted es hora without the la. But i have always heard both. Will report. 5/18/15

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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"La hora" was rejected. It sounds wrong to me without the "la" in Spanish.

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brian845704

@Elizadeux: "Qué hora es?" I'm sure you've learned that phrase, no? There is no article in that sentence either.

If you were referring to time in general (la hora) then you would use "la," but we aren't. The sentence is stating that now is the specific time to establish new rules.

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Perriguez
Perriguez
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I think so, in Spanish it would be right

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClemdonB

Why put "de" infront of "establecer"? Is that really necessary

12
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kcmurphy
kcmurphyPlus
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Yes, it's necessary. It's just one of those grammar rules.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClemdonB

I wasn't taught this rule on doulingo, so why bring it up now? I think they should be a module to this atleast.

0
Reply11 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

So hora de = time to. How did you know to use 'de' for 'hora de = time to. Is there a clue that I may need a 'linking preposition'?

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Swifta
Swifta
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I found it easiest to watch a few Spanish flicks which really helps with the sentence builds (not with vocabulary). That way you would know hora de sounds more natural then hora a or hora en etc.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I must be watching the wrong flicks/videos/movies/news. I'm not serious and besides I posted my questions months ago. Nevertheless you're right it does help to learn spanish if you watch videos, listen to music and audio books, podcasts etc. I do all of this on a daily basis. I say this as a general statement but not specific to my above question. A more important fact I would like to pass along is what I've found useful is online websites and spanish books containing 'phrases'. Google it and you'll find several. This is what really is helping me learn phrase and sentence construction.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/defiantoli

Why is this not correct Es el momento de establecer nuevas reglas.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abarnowl

I have the same question!

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jasmine_Parmley

How do you know if the adjective comes before the verb?

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joshua6261

it usually comes after but there are exceptions http://goo.gl/mG6S9q thanks PuntoH for providing the link

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jasmine_Parmley

Thank you so much :)

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pavelmeshchanov
pavelmeshchanov
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"Es la hora" with the article is not accepted? I've heard it zillion of times (España).

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshaan96

Reglas nuevas- where was i wrong?!

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joshua6261

http://goo.gl/mG6S9q thanks PuntoH for providing the link

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaDunste
AnnaDunste
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I had this as a multiple choice "select all correct translations" question. It said "Es vez para establecer nuevas reglas" was not correct taking only "Es hora de establecer nuevas reglas". I reported it but is there an actual reason this would be incorrect that I don't know of or is it just duo being duo? Thanks

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/QuintanillaJon

I put: "Es tiempo para establecer las reglas nuevas" and got marked wrong? I even used google translate and it said it was correct.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PuntoH
PuntoH
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You shouldn't rely too much on google translator.

  • It's time to = Es tiempo de ---> This is a literal translation, and not that common, however, it's still right.
  • It's time to = Es hora de ---> This one is way more common than the previous one.
1
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

Is it truly incorrect to say "Es la hora de...?" It seems like it should be fine.

9
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/QuintanillaJon

That makes sense, thank you mein amigo! :)

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Claudio, thanks, it's nice to learn this SOMEWHERE, even after one does everything else right, but has not learned that construction yet, so gets it wrong. This is how my 30-minute lessons end up being an hour.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jmarieg
Jmarieg
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It took reglas nuevas a minute ago, and now counted it wrong. Seriously frustrating.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anyshaa
Anyshaa
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Es possible decir "Es tiempo para.."?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ah56
ah56
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Es hora de ... es hora a ... es hora que ... ???

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JerryFalco1

Why can't you use season for time? I know its not exactly the same; but loosely translated it could work.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dakota_Marz

Why is "la hora" not accepted? I thought abstract nouns got the definite article.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pavelmeshchanov
pavelmeshchanov
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Report it. La HORA must be accepted I am absolutely sure. Ex.: Es la hora de salir.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElCoronelEsponja

That's what you say when you're losing!

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobChristiansen

Es tiempo de establecer nuevas reglas.

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tamrenae

Why DE instead of A? I thought A = to and DE = from. So "Es hora A establecer ..." sounds right to me. What am I missing here?

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaDunste
AnnaDunste
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because it's not true that a=to and de=of, because it's spanish, not a code for english. Generally those are fair translations, but I think in this case the spanish is more like, "It is the hour(time) of establishing new rules" if you were to get more literal with the translation. You will encounter similar confusion later with other verbs that include the 'to', although I can't recall a specific example offhand, but phrases that translate into english with a "to" but there is no word to indicate it in the spanish.
I'm not trying to be rude, just helpful, but I can't think of a better way to phrase it right now, so sorry if it sounds a little rude :)

3
Reply21 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tamrenae

Thanks Anna, not rude at all. Oh I have seen more examples of "exceptions to rules" than anything else while learning this new language! I am enjoying the challenge, to be sure, but I do get frustrated at times, and I think my recent confusion was just a "last straw" kind of thing that caused me to blow a fuse or something :) Just when I think I am beginning to understand some things on a deeper level the rules seem to change on me! Interesting that my breaking point on "rules" happened with this particular phrase about establishing new rules! Thanks for the fresh perspective.

4
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pavelmeshchanov
pavelmeshchanov
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You are right, absolutely, AnnaDunste "it is not a code for English". Exactly like the other languages as well. Just one example: English - to wait for, while German - warten auf, and yet as a word AUF literally ON, in the majority of cases, never FOR. FOR = FÜR in German. :)

3
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pokerguy365

Why is "Es el tiempo para establecer reglas nuevas" wrong?

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/motherindie

I am so over this question. Last time I got it wrong for choosing the answer they insist on this time.

0
Reply1 year ago